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mj2003

E-mail

Toronto,
15.03.2009, 04:14
 

Retinol Grows Hair in Study (Topicals & Shampoos)

How I Accidentally Grew Hair on My Left Temple with Retinol Experiment Conclusion

This post is the rather surprising conclusion of my topical retinol experiment.

For the past six months, I've used retinol, a form of vitamin A, on the left side of my face. The idea was to see whether it improves fine wrinkles and increases collagen production like at least one study suggests.

I have to admit I haven't seen much in terms of skin quality during these six months. I don't really have wrinkles at this age, but the fine lines on my forehead and the small crow's feet next to my eyes are still there.

I don't doubt the quality of the product, however. Applying the cream on my face gives a slight tinge, and afterwards there is a small but notable peeling effect. This peeling effect is behind the effectiveness of stronger forms of vitamin A, like tretinoin. Retinol is not supposed to cause peeling, but at least the 2% cream I used seemed to do so.

The surprise is that I have grown a few new hairs on my left temple. Even though I have experimented with and reported on various substances that are supposed to grow hair, this experiment was not supposed to be about growing hair. It happened by accident.

I'm pretty sure my hairline has always been where it is now, and no hair has ever grown where these new hairs are suddenly sprouting up. I'm not sure yet whether they're vellus hairs or terminal hairs, but it seems they're still growing.

I attempted to capture the whole thing with a camera. The result is not that great, but you can see the areas where the 3-4 new hairs are growing from circled with red.

[image]
[image]

On the right temple where no retinol was applied, no new hair is growing, so I think it's safe to conclude that the hair growth effect is due to the retinol cream. If you've read the blog before, you know that this is not my usual conclusion (for examples, see the conclusions to my MSM experiment and biotin experiment).

As you can see, it's very modest: only a couple of new hairs are growing and you kind of have to zoom in to even see it. Still, I find the result interesting, since it proves that retinol is absorbed and does something to the skin. It's effect on wrinkles may be too small to notice, but it's effect on hair growth is visible.

Especially strange is that, as far as I know, this is not a part of the skin where hair used to grow and is now growing again, but a part of the skin where hair has never grown.

If you're bald, I doubt retinol cream alone will grow you a new set of hair. Nonetheless, I think these results warrant further studies on how different forms of vitamin A affect hair growth. I'm probably going to give tretinoin a go next to see whether the stronger stuff has a stronger effect.

I would like to see these results replicated in other people, so if you've tried retinol or tretinoin, do drop a comment and tell about your experience!




mj2003 is located in TORONTO and he is available to meet: YES
email hairsite@aol.com to arrange a meeting.


Post reply
rooster

15.03.2009, 09:33

@ mj2003

Retinol Grows Hair in Study

How I Accidentally Grew Hair on My Left Temple with Retinol Experiment
Conclusion

This post is the rather surprising conclusion of my topical retinol
experiment.

For the past six months, I've used retinol, a form of vitamin A, on the
left side of my face. The idea was to see whether it improves fine wrinkles
and increases collagen production like at least one study suggests.

I have to admit I haven't seen much in terms of skin quality during these
six months. I don't really have wrinkles at this age, but the fine lines on
my forehead and the small crow's feet next to my eyes are still there.

I don't doubt the quality of the product, however. Applying the cream on
my face gives a slight tinge, and afterwards there is a small but notable
peeling effect. This peeling effect is behind the effectiveness of stronger
forms of vitamin A, like tretinoin. Retinol is not supposed to cause
peeling, but at least the 2% cream I used seemed to do so.

The surprise is that I have grown a few new hairs on my left temple. Even
though I have experimented with and reported on various substances that are
supposed to grow hair, this experiment was not supposed to be about growing
hair. It happened by accident.

I'm pretty sure my hairline has always been where it is now, and no hair
has ever grown where these new hairs are suddenly sprouting up. I'm not
sure yet whether they're vellus hairs or terminal hairs, but it seems
they're still growing.

I attempted to capture the whole thing with a camera. The result is not
that great, but you can see the areas where the 3-4 new hairs are growing
from circled with red.

[image]
[image]

On the right temple where no retinol was applied, no new hair is growing,
so I think it's safe to conclude that the hair growth effect is due to the
retinol cream. If you've read the blog before, you know that this is not my
usual conclusion (for examples, see the conclusions to my MSM experiment
and biotin experiment).

As you can see, it's very modest: only a couple of new hairs are growing
and you kind of have to zoom in to even see it. Still, I find the result
interesting, since it proves that retinol is absorbed and does something to
the skin. It's effect on wrinkles may be too small to notice, but it's
effect on hair growth is visible.

Especially strange is that, as far as I know, this is not a part of the
skin where hair used to grow and is now growing again, but a part of the
skin where hair has never grown.

If you're bald, I doubt retinol cream alone will grow you a new set of
hair. Nonetheless, I think these results warrant further studies on how
different forms of vitamin A affect hair growth. I'm probably going to give
tretinoin a go next to see whether the stronger stuff has a stronger
effect.

I would like to see these results replicated in other people, so if you've
tried retinol or tretinoin, do drop a comment and tell about your
experience!

It is not unusual to have hairs come and go well below your hairline. Copper peptides should work better than retinol in theory.




rooster is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
rooster

04.05.2009, 18:56

@ rooster

Retinol Grows Hair in Study

How I Accidentally Grew Hair on My Left Temple with Retinol
Experiment
Conclusion


This post is the rather surprising conclusion of my topical retinol
experiment.

For the past six months, I've used retinol, a form of vitamin A, on the
left side of my face. The idea was to see whether it improves fine
wrinkles
and increases collagen production like at least one study suggests.

I have to admit I haven't seen much in terms of skin quality during
these
six months. I don't really have wrinkles at this age, but the fine lines
on
my forehead and the small crow's feet next to my eyes are still there.

I don't doubt the quality of the product, however. Applying the cream
on
my face gives a slight tinge, and afterwards there is a small but
notable
peeling effect. This peeling effect is behind the effectiveness of
stronger
forms of vitamin A, like tretinoin. Retinol is not supposed to cause
peeling, but at least the 2% cream I used seemed to do so.

The surprise is that I have grown a few new hairs on my left temple.
Even
though I have experimented with and reported on various substances that
are
supposed to grow hair, this experiment was not supposed to be about
growing
hair. It happened by accident.

I'm pretty sure my hairline has always been where it is now, and no
hair
has ever grown where these new hairs are suddenly sprouting up. I'm not
sure yet whether they're vellus hairs or terminal hairs, but it seems
they're still growing.

I attempted to capture the whole thing with a camera. The result is not
that great, but you can see the areas where the 3-4 new hairs are
growing
from circled with red.

[image]
[image]

On the right temple where no retinol was applied, no new hair is
growing,
so I think it's safe to conclude that the hair growth effect is due to
the
retinol cream. If you've read the blog before, you know that this is not
my
usual conclusion (for examples, see the conclusions to my MSM
experiment
and biotin experiment).

As you can see, it's very modest: only a couple of new hairs are
growing
and you kind of have to zoom in to even see it. Still, I find the
result
interesting, since it proves that retinol is absorbed and does something
to
the skin. It's effect on wrinkles may be too small to notice, but it's
effect on hair growth is visible.

Especially strange is that, as far as I know, this is not a part of the
skin where hair used to grow and is now growing again, but a part of
the
skin where hair has never grown.

If you're bald, I doubt retinol cream alone will grow you a new set of
hair. Nonetheless, I think these results warrant further studies on how
different forms of vitamin A affect hair growth. I'm probably going to
give
tretinoin a go next to see whether the stronger stuff has a stronger
effect.

I would like to see these results replicated in other people, so if
you've
tried retinol or tretinoin, do drop a comment and tell about your
experience!

It is not unusual to have hairs come and go well below your hairline.
Copper peptides should work better than retinol in theory.

Fat Synthesizing Enzyme Is Key To Healthy Skin And Hair

ScienceDaily (Feb. 17, 2009) Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes of Cardiovascular Disease (GICD) have found that an enzyme associated with the synthesis of fat in the body is also an element in healthy skin and hair.

The enzyme is acyl CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 or DGAT1. Mice that lack DGAT1 have many interesting characteristics. For example, they are lean, resistant to diet-induced obesity, are more sensitive to insulin and leptin, and have abnormalities in mammary gland development and skin.

When Gladstone researchers in the laboratory of Robert V. Farese, Jr. used genetic engineering to delete the enzyme in mice, they found that lack of DGAT1 caused levels of retinoic acid (RA) to be greatly increased in skin and resulted in the loss of hair. Their findings were reported in The Journal of Biological Chemistry.

"For some time, we have been studying the enzymes that make triglycerides," said Robert V. Farese, Jr., senior investigator and senior author on the study. "We found that one of these enzymes is a major regulator of retinoic acid actions in the skin."

RA, which comes from vitamin A (retinol) has been used to treat skin disorders, such as acne and psoriasis, and certain cancers, but it is fairly toxic and must be carefully controlled.

In mice without DGAT1, the skin was very sensitive to retinol. The loss of DGAT1 also caused alopecia, or hair loss. Both of these effects could be prevented by depriving the mice of a source of retinol in their diet. It turns out that DGAT1 can convert retinol to a relatively inert storage form. Without DGAT1, this ability is lost, and any excess retinol in the skin can be converted to RA.

"Our results show that DGAT1 is an important component for controlling retinoic acid levels in the skin of mice," said Michelle Shih, the lead author on the study. "These findings may have implications for the treatment of human skin or hair disorders."

Maureen A. Kane, Ping Zhou, C.L. Eric Yen, Ryan S. Streeper, Joseph L. Napoli, & Robert V. Farese Jr. also contributed to the research. Funding was provided by NIH grants DK-056084 to R.F. and DK36870 to JLN, and by an extramural research facilities grant from the National Center for Research Resources (C06 RR018928), and by the J. David Gladstone Institutes.




rooster is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Bryan

04.05.2009, 19:52

@ mj2003

Let's make sure we're talking about the same thing...

For the past six months, I've used retinol, a form of vitamin A, on the
left side of my face. The idea was to see whether it improves fine wrinkles
and increases collagen production like at least one study suggests.

I think it's a bit misleading to say that retinol is "a form of vitamin A". Retinol _is_ vitamin A!

As for the part about improving fine wrinkles -- are you confusing retinol (vitamin A) with Retin-A? :-)




Bryan is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
mj2003

E-mail

Toronto,
05.05.2009, 20:04

@ Bryan

Bryan, I thought I'd share something with you =I

BRYAN, I HAVEN'T SHARED THIS WITH ANYONE, BUT HOW DO YOU EXPLAIN THIS...

I HAVE STOPPED USING MINOXIDIL FOR 3 WEEKS NOW (give or take) AND USE DUT ABOUT 1 - TIMES A WEEK FOR THE PAST 60 DAYS. MY CROWN IS STILL FILLING IN.


For the past six months, I've used retinol, a form of vitamin A, on the
left side of my face. The idea was to see whether it improves fine
wrinkles
and increases collagen production like at least one study suggests.

I think it's a bit misleading to say that retinol is "a form of vitamin
A". Retinol _is_ vitamin A!

As for the part about improving fine wrinkles -- are you confusing retinol
(vitamin A) with Retin-A? :-)




mj2003 is located in TORONTO and he is available to meet: YES
email hairsite@aol.com to arrange a meeting.


Post reply
Bryan

07.05.2009, 00:18

@ mj2003

Bryan, I thought I'd share something with you =I

BRYAN, I HAVEN'T SHARED THIS WITH ANYONE, BUT HOW DO YOU EXPLAIN THIS...

I HAVE STOPPED USING MINOXIDIL FOR 3 WEEKS NOW (give or take) AND USE DUT
ABOUT 1 - TIMES A WEEK FOR THE PAST 60 DAYS. MY CROWN IS STILL FILLING
IN.

Beats me what's going on there...




Bryan is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply

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