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heiny7

21.03.2012, 17:14
 

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News (Hair Multiplication & Stem Cells Treatment)

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/03/21/scientists-identify-protein-responsible-for-male-pattern-baldness/?intcmp=features



Researchers have identified the protein responsible for male pattern baldness, raising expectations that an effective treatment for the most common cause of hair loss in men is on the horizon.

Male pattern baldness affects 8 out of 10 men and causes the hair follicles to shrink and produce microscopic hairs, which grow for a shorter duration of time than normal hairs.

“We looked at bald scalps last year and saw the hair follicles were still present,” senior author Dr. George Cotsarelis, chair and professor of Dermatology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, told FoxNews.com. “So we inferred there was either a lack of an activator [to spur hair growth] or the presence of an inhibitor.”

Using microrays, Cotsarelis and his colleagues took tissue samples from the scalps of men who suffered from androgenetic alopecia and measured levels of different genes. The samples were taken from both bald spots on the scalps and spots with hair.

The researchers found the bald spots had abnormally high levels of a protein called Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2)—nearly three times the amount present in the scalp areas with hair.

Once the researchers identified the protein, they did further functional tests to study what effect PGD2 had on hair in mice and hair follicles grown in a lab.

“It really decreased the growth,” Cotsarelis said, adding that the findings are “completely new.”

“Nobody had any idea that PGD2 had anything to do with hair growth,” he said. “We knew there were other prostaglandins that could encourage hair growth. Take Latisse, which uses a prostaglandin (F2alpha) to lengthen eyelashes. That was found entirely by accident. Patients with glaucoma were using eye-drops that contained the prostaglandin and noticed their eyelashes growing.”

PGD2, on the other hand, is an analog of F2alpha, meaning it works in the opposite way and causes hair to grow shorter.

However, for the protein to inhibit hair growth, it has to first bind to a receptor (GPR44). This receptor, according to Cotsarelis, is the target for future treatments to combat baldness.

“We had genetically modified mice that lacked the GPR44 receptors for the PGD2 protein,” explained Cotsarelis. “In normal mice, PGD2 inhibited hair growth, but in mice with non-functional receptors, the hair grew fine.”

“The inhibitory effects of PGD2 act through the receptor, so what we want to do is block the receptor,” he said.

Some compounds targeting the GPR44 receptor are already underway in other labs to treat other health issues such as asthma. In addition to regulating hair growth, prostaglandins also control cell growth and constricting and dilating smooth muscle tissue.

Cotsarelis believes this latest finding means a topical treatment for male pattern baldness may also be on the way soon.

“Absolutely,” he said. “Our research was so targeted toward figuring what was wrong—studying people who have baldness disorder—that by discovering this receptor I think there’s a really good chance of developing a treatment not too far down the road.”



Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/03/21/scientists-identify-protein-responsible-for-male-pattern-baldness/?intcmp=features#ixzz1pmvmo9NM




heiny7 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
News

21.03.2012, 20:24

@ heiny7

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» “Absolutely,” he said. “Our research was so targeted toward figuring what
» was wrong—studying people who have baldness disorder—that by discovering
» this receptor I think there’s a really good chance of developing a
» treatment not too far down the road.”


Only five years away...




News is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
heiny7

21.03.2012, 21:34

@ News

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

Nothing concrete will be before that anyway. If its 5 years away, I think many people would be happy. I give it 3 years now that they have discovered the specific protein.




heiny7 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
moawk

Germany,
21.03.2012, 22:16

@ heiny7

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» Nothing concrete will be before that anyway. If its 5 years away, I think
» many people would be happy. I give it 3 years now that they have discovered
» the specific protein.

this is huge news !!

LET THE ASSTALKERS and EXPERTS DOWNTALK this and SAY:


[image]




moawk is located in GERMANY and he is available to meet: NO

---
1. Predicted the failure of replicel, months in advance.
2. Predicted how their stock would rise/drop even with exact numbers.
3. Predicted the wild claims and crazyness that gc83uk's donor regeneration will cause among the HT industry during this summer. Including rassman's opinion, Dr. Woods special patients and Pro hair clinic photos.
4. Predicted Gho will open up a clinic in asia.
5. No prediction on Histogen. Looks promising if they didn't fake results.
6. Predicted the only viable HM technique other than Gho would surface when hairs are: "generated through the appropriate cell populations" -Team Tokyo 2012


[image]
- Moawk

Advice for patients: If you are considering a hair transplant, only consider Gho's HST and nothing else. First HT treatment in the world that offers: zero scarring, small downtime and donor regrowth.
http://www.hasci.com

Advice for Investors in HM: Invest in Team Tokyo.
http://www.tsuji-lab.com/en/research/organ/hair.html
Ditch replicel, aderans. They are done for and have no future.


Post reply
superhl

21.03.2012, 23:13

@ heiny7

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-03-inhibitor-male-pattern-baldness-hair-loss.html
Sounds very confident and as if the solution is already available.




superhl is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Freddie555

22.03.2012, 04:37

@ superhl

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

This does not sound like it would help people who have already lost hair where the follicles are dead.

"I think there’s a really good chance of developing a treatment not too far down the road.

Wasn't Cotserellis saying the same thing back in 2008 in that interview where he revealed he had found mice growing hair during injury recovery.




Freddie555 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
"When true Hair Multiplication comes, it will arise out of the East." - John The Revelator, Feb. 18, 2001


Post reply
georgex6

GREECE ATHENS,
22.03.2012, 05:03

@ Freddie555

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

how about making a topical solution with laropiprant?
http://medsindia.com/tredaptive-nicitinic-acid-1000mg-laropiprant-20mg.html




georgex6 is located in GREECE ATHENS and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Iron_Man

22.03.2012, 05:54

@ heiny7

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/03/21/scientists-identify-protein-responsible-for-male-pattern-baldness/?intcmp=features

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
http://health.msn.com/health-topics/skin-and-hair/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100288313

Dr. Sanusi Umar, a dermatologist in Redondo Beach, Calif. and associate faculty at University of California, Los Angeles, said it's long been known that prostaglandins are involved with hair growth, while this study shows that the opposite may also be true.

For example, Latisse (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) is a synthetic prostaglandin (mimicking PGF2) that encourages eyelash growth, while Rogaine (minoxidil) is thought to work by promoting the activity of another prostaglandin, PGE2, Umar noted.

"This study tells the other side of the story," he said.

Yet, Umar urged men not to toss out their Rogaine yet. "Yes, this may open another front from which hair loss may be treated. It is not likely to be the panacea, however," he added.

There are likely multiple prostaglandins involved with inhibiting or promoting hair growth, he pointed out. Steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs also inhibit PGD2 "but have not been shown to consistently grow hair," Umar noted.

"It is more likely that a number of end factors contribute to hair loss with factors like PGD2 inhibiting hair growth and others such as PGE2 and PGF2 promoting it," he said. "PGD2 inhibition may emerge as part of a combined approach used in combination with agents that work via different mechanisms . . . as a more effective approach to hair loss treatment."

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

His analysis is not bad - for a hair transplant doctor.




Iron_Man is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
I documented the world’s 1st day-by-day (HST) donor hair regeneration process …


Post reply
Bezzzo

22.03.2012, 07:15

@ heiny7

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

It's a wonder why they only just realised now to compare gene samples from the balding area and the non affected area with hair...

Maybe this is also why Follica haven't had any new news, old mate Costeralis has been working on this instead.




Bezzzo is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

22.03.2012, 12:44

@ heiny7

It's very interesting...

But this article seems to say that drugs that these types of drugs are already in late stage development and they are not showing signs of growing hair. These drugs are almost ready to come to market but hair growth is not being seen in test subjects taking these types of drugs.

http://www.fiercebiotech.com/story/merck-drug-homes-new-baldness-target/2012-03-22




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

22.03.2012, 12:48

@ superhl

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-03-inhibitor-male-pattern-baldness-hair-loss.html
» Sounds very confident and as if the solution is already available.

I read an article that said that drugs that do what needs to be done are in late stage development. That would mean those drugs are in phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. That means these drugs would hit the market in maybe 1.5 to 2 years.

The drugs are being tested for other medical problems, not hair loss.
Unfortunately the article also says that the subjects in the clinical trials are not seeing hair growth. Check out this link. Drugs that do what we would want them to do are in late stage development but not showing hair growth if I read the article correctly. I perused it quickly so not sure.

http://www.fiercebiotech.com/story/merck-drug-homes-new-baldness-target/2012-03-22




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
FatalEvolution

UR'ANUS,
22.03.2012, 13:22

@ heiny7

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» Nothing concrete will be before that anyway. If its 5 years away, I think
» many people would be happy. I give it 3 years now that they have discovered
» the specific protein.

I WANT IT ON MY DESK NOW IN TEN MINUTES

:-D




FatalEvolution is located in UR\'ANUS and he is available to meet: YES
email hairsite@aol.com to arrange a meeting.


Post reply
KO

22.03.2012, 14:11

@ Iron_Man

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» His analysis is not bad - for a hair transplant doctor.

Dr Umar is also a dermatologist as well, like Dr Bernstein.




KO is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
KO

22.03.2012, 14:12

@ jarjarbinx

It's very interesting...

» But this article seems to say that drugs that these types of drugs are
» already in late stage development and they are not showing signs of growing
» hair. These drugs are almost ready to come to market but hair growth is not
» being seen in test subjects taking these types of drugs.
»
» http://www.fiercebiotech.com/story/merck-drug-homes-new-baldness-target/2012-03-22

These things may need to be concentrated topically to have a good effect.




KO is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

22.03.2012, 14:19

@ KO

It's very interesting...

» » But this article seems to say that drugs that these types of drugs are
» » already in late stage development and they are not showing signs of
» growing
» » hair. These drugs are almost ready to come to market but hair growth is
» not
» » being seen in test subjects taking these types of drugs.
» »
» »
» http://www.fiercebiotech.com/story/merck-drug-homes-new-baldness-target/2012-03-22
»
» These things may need to be concentrated topically to have a good effect.

I don't know what to make of this news. It could be something really big that we could exploit right now. Remember since it is in late stage development that means we already know that it is likely very safe. For example, if similar drugs are in phase 3, nearing completion of phase 3, then that means it has already completed safety of phase 1 and phase 2 and is almost done with safety for phase 3. That would look like a lock for safety. If similar drugs are deep into phase two with no safety problems then that would be a pretty good indication that it is probably safe and we should be trying to figure out how we could start using it as soon as it hits the marketplace.




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Rob35

22.03.2012, 15:25

@ jarjarbinx

It's very interesting...

» » » But this article seems to say that drugs that these types of drugs are
» » » already in late stage development and they are not showing signs of
» » growing
» » » hair. These drugs are almost ready to come to market but hair growth
» is
» » not
» » » being seen in test subjects taking these types of drugs.
» » »
» » »
» »
» http://www.fiercebiotech.com/story/merck-drug-homes-new-baldness-target/2012-03-22
» »
» » These things may need to be concentrated topically to have a good
» effect.
»
» I don't know what to make of this news. It could be something really big
» that we could exploit right now. Remember since it is in late stage
» development that means we already know that it is likely very safe. For
» example, if similar drugs are in phase 3, nearing completion of phase 3,
» then that means it has already completed safety of phase 1 and phase 2 and
» is almost done with safety for phase 3. That would look like a lock for
» safety. If similar drugs are deep into phase two with no safety problems
» then that would be a pretty good indication that it is probably safe and we
» should be trying to figure out how we could start using it as soon as it
» hits the marketplace.


Merck is testing laropiprant as a flushing inhibitor to be administered with niacin. Allschwil, Switzerland-based Actelion’s setipiprant is being studied as a treatment for allergic inflammation of nasal pathways. Both therapies are in the final phase of testing generally needed for regulatory approval.




Rob35 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Ahab

22.03.2012, 15:39

@ jarjarbinx

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» I read an article that said that drugs that do what needs to be done are in
» late stage development.

» The drugs are being tested for other medical problems, not hair loss.
» Unfortunately the article also says


But to what degree are the researchers looking for any hair growth or loss?

If their observations are just casual, then it would mean the drug does not produce dramatic effects on hair.

But if the drug added some density, say 20% more hair, such an increase might go unnoticed if researchers just casually compare what a test subject's hair looks like today with what the researcher seems to remember it looked like months and months ago.




Ahab is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
News

22.03.2012, 15:40

@ Rob35

It's very interesting...

http://www.nj.com/business/index.ssf/2012/03/research_shows_mercks_prospect.html


From the article:

"Merck isn’t studying the anti-flushing drug in hair loss, said Ian McConnell, a Merck spokesman, in a telephone interview. “We haven’t seen any signals” in patient trials that the therapy might reduce baldness, he said."




News is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

22.03.2012, 16:19
(edited by jarjarbinx, 22.03.2012, 16:35)

@ News

It's very interesting...

» http://www.nj.com/business/index.ssf/2012/03/research_shows_mercks_prospect.html
»
»
» From the article:
»
» "Merck isn’t studying the anti-flushing drug in hair loss, said Ian
» McConnell, a Merck spokesman, in a telephone interview. “We haven’t seen
» any signals” in patient trials that the therapy might reduce baldness, he
» said."


But we do not know if the subjects in the study are people that would benefit from the hair growth aspect of this drug. For example, they may all be too old or none of them may be missing hair. we do not know anything about the patient subjects who were being given this medicine for a totally different reason rather than hair growth.




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Rob35

22.03.2012, 16:29

@ Rob35

It's very interesting...

» » » » But this article seems to say that drugs that these types of drugs
» are
» » » » already in late stage development and they are not showing signs of
» » » growing
» » » » hair. These drugs are almost ready to come to market but hair growth
» » is
» » » not
» » » » being seen in test subjects taking these types of drugs.
» » » »
» » » »
» » »
» »
» http://www.fiercebiotech.com/story/merck-drug-homes-new-baldness-target/2012-03-22
» » »
» » » These things may need to be concentrated topically to have a good
» » effect.
» »
» » I don't know what to make of this news. It could be something really
» big
» » that we could exploit right now. Remember since it is in late stage
» » development that means we already know that it is likely very safe. For
» » example, if similar drugs are in phase 3, nearing completion of phase 3,
» » then that means it has already completed safety of phase 1 and phase 2
» and
» » is almost done with safety for phase 3. That would look like a lock for
» » safety. If similar drugs are deep into phase two with no safety
» problems
» » then that would be a pretty good indication that it is probably safe and
» we
» » should be trying to figure out how we could start using it as soon as it
» » hits the marketplace.
»
»
» Merck is testing laropiprant as a flushing inhibitor to be administered
» with niacin. Allschwil, Switzerland-based Actelion’s setipiprant is being
» studied as a treatment for allergic inflammation of nasal pathways. Both
» therapies are in the final phase of testing generally needed for regulatory
» approval.

Extended release nicotinic acid/laropiprant (Tredaptive®) is accepted for restricted use within NHS Scotland.
http://www.scottishmedicines.org.uk/SMC_Advice/Advice/614_10_nicotinic_acid_laropiprant_Tredaptive/nicotinic_acid_laropiprant__Tredaptive_




Rob35 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Rob35

22.03.2012, 16:31

@ Rob35

It's very interesting...

» » » » » But this article seems to say that drugs that these types of drugs
» » are
» » » » » already in late stage development and they are not showing signs
» of
» » » » growing
» » » » » hair. These drugs are almost ready to come to market but hair
» growth
» » » is
» » » » not
» » » » » being seen in test subjects taking these types of drugs.
» » » » »
» » » » »
» » » »
» » »
» »
» http://www.fiercebiotech.com/story/merck-drug-homes-new-baldness-target/2012-03-22
» » » »
» » » » These things may need to be concentrated topically to have a good
» » » effect.
» » »
» » » I don't know what to make of this news. It could be something really
» » big
» » » that we could exploit right now. Remember since it is in late stage
» » » development that means we already know that it is likely very safe.
» For
» » » example, if similar drugs are in phase 3, nearing completion of phase
» 3,
» » » then that means it has already completed safety of phase 1 and phase 2
» » and
» » » is almost done with safety for phase 3. That would look like a lock
» for
» » » safety. If similar drugs are deep into phase two with no safety
» » problems
» » » then that would be a pretty good indication that it is probably safe
» and
» » we
» » » should be trying to figure out how we could start using it as soon as
» it
» » » hits the marketplace.
» »
» »
» » Merck is testing laropiprant as a flushing inhibitor to be administered
» » with niacin. Allschwil, Switzerland-based Actelion’s setipiprant is
» being
» » studied as a treatment for allergic inflammation of nasal pathways. Both
» » therapies are in the final phase of testing generally needed for
» regulatory
» » approval.
»
» Extended release nicotinic acid/laropiprant (Tredaptive®) is accepted for
» restricted use within NHS Scotland.
» http://www.scottishmedicines.org.uk/SMC_Advice/Advice/614_10_nicotinic_acid_laropiprant_Tredaptive/nicotinic_acid_laropiprant__Tredaptive_



Date Advice Published: 10 May 2010




Rob35 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
TAGOHL

22.03.2012, 16:49

@ News

It's very interesting...

» From the article:
»
» "Merck isn’t studying the anti-flushing drug in hair loss, said Ian
» McConnell, a Merck spokesman, in a telephone interview. “We haven’t seen
» any signals” in patient trials that the therapy might reduce baldness, he
» said."

That's because Merck's drug blocks the wrong PGD2 receptor! I just posted this on the feircebiotech site. There are two types of PGD2 receptors, DP1 and DP2 (DP2 is also known as 'GPR44' and 'CRTH2'). Laropiprant (Merck's drug) selectively blocks the PD1 receptor - Cotsarelis showed that the PD2 receptor (and not PD1) is involved in hair growth downregulation. BTW, niacin produces flushing via the PD1 receptor - the PD2 receptor is not involved in the flushing at all.

Here is the Cotsarelis abstract:

http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/4/126/126ra34

Prostaglandin D2 Inhibits Hair Growth and Is Elevated in Bald Scalp of Men with Androgenetic Alopecia.

Testosterone is necessary for the development of male pattern baldness, known as androgenetic alopecia (AGA); yet, the mechanisms for decreased hair growth in this disorder are unclear. We show that prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS) is elevated at the mRNA and protein levels in bald scalp compared to haired scalp of men with AGA. The product of PTGDS enzyme activity, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), is similarly elevated in bald scalp. During normal follicle cycling in mice, Ptgds and PGD2 levels increase immediately preceding the regression phase, suggesting an inhibitory effect on hair growth. We show that PGD2 inhibits hair growth in explanted human hair follicles and when applied topically to mice. Hair growth inhibition requires the PGD2 receptor G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide)–coupled receptor 44 (GPR44), but not the PGD2 receptor 1 (PTGDR). Furthermore, we find that a transgenic mouse, K14-Ptgs2, which targets prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 expression to the skin, demonstrates elevated levels of PGD2 in the skin and develops alopecia, follicular miniaturization, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia, which are all hallmarks of human AGA. These results define PGD2 as an inhibitor of hair growth in AGA and suggest the PGD2-GPR44 pathway as a potential target for treatment.

Copyright © 2012, American Association for the Advancement of Science




TAGOHL is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
TAGOHL

22.03.2012, 16:57

@ TAGOHL

It's very interesting...

Also from my other post on that site:

Setipiprant by Actelion blocks the right PGD2 receptor implicated in MPB (PD2). Right now, setipiprant is in phase 2/3 testing.




TAGOHL is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Dogstar

22.03.2012, 19:41

@ TAGOHL

It's very interesting...

» » From the article:
» »
» » "Merck isn’t studying the anti-flushing drug in hair loss, said Ian
» » McConnell, a Merck spokesman, in a telephone interview. “We haven’t seen
» » any signals” in patient trials that the therapy might reduce baldness,
» he
» » said."
»
» That's because Merck's drug blocks the wrong PGD2 receptor! I just posted
» this on the feircebiotech site. There are two types of PGD2 receptors, DP1
» and DP2 (DP2 is also known as 'GPR44' and 'CRTH2'). Laropiprant (Merck's
» drug) selectively blocks the PD1 receptor - Cotsarelis showed that the PD2
» receptor (and not PD1) is involved in hair growth downregulation. BTW,
» niacin produces flushing via the PD1 receptor - the PD2 receptor is not
» involved in the flushing at all.
»
» Here is the Cotsarelis abstract:
»
» http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/4/126/126ra34
»
» Prostaglandin D2 Inhibits Hair Growth and Is Elevated in Bald Scalp of Men
» with Androgenetic Alopecia.
»
» Testosterone is necessary for the development of male pattern baldness,
» known as androgenetic alopecia (AGA); yet, the mechanisms for decreased
» hair growth in this disorder are unclear. We show that prostaglandin D2
» synthase (PTGDS) is elevated at the mRNA and protein levels in bald scalp
» compared to haired scalp of men with AGA. The product of PTGDS enzyme
» activity, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), is similarly elevated in bald scalp.
» During normal follicle cycling in mice, Ptgds and PGD2 levels increase
» immediately preceding the regression phase, suggesting an inhibitory effect
» on hair growth. We show that PGD2 inhibits hair growth in explanted human
» hair follicles and when applied topically to mice. Hair growth inhibition
» requires the PGD2 receptor G protein (heterotrimeric guanine
» nucleotide)–coupled receptor 44 (GPR44), but not the PGD2 receptor 1
» (PTGDR). Furthermore, we find that a transgenic mouse, K14-Ptgs2, which
» targets prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 expression to the skin,
» demonstrates elevated levels of PGD2 in the skin and develops alopecia,
» follicular miniaturization, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia, which are all
» hallmarks of human AGA. These results define PGD2 as an inhibitor of hair
» growth in AGA and suggest the PGD2-GPR44 pathway as a potential target for
» treatment.
»
» Copyright © 2012, American Association for the Advancement of Science

Nice to see you post again, posters like yourself have been missed.




Dogstar is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
KO

22.03.2012, 19:43

@ Dogstar

It's very interesting...

» Nice to see you post again, posters like yourself have been missed.

This.




KO is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Van Halen

22.03.2012, 19:51

@ KO

It's very interesting...

What can we do as a community to get more answers on this product? From what I read they already know it works, they have the investors, now what ?
Anyway Hairsite can dig up some info? You know I own a website with around 20 000 members.
What's the time table on this product. this summer or 5 yrs? Don't understand seems like most of the stuff already passed FDa

anyways




Van Halen is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Freddie555

22.03.2012, 22:19

@ Van Halen

It's very interesting...

Well I would think the logical thing to do would be to ask the Astressin-B researchers to make this a target for their research as well.

But seeing how unruly monkeys have been attacking the Astressin-B researchers who have volunteered their time, I'm afraid it might not be a good idea.




Freddie555 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
"When true Hair Multiplication comes, it will arise out of the East." - John The Revelator, Feb. 18, 2001


Post reply
needhelp

23.03.2012, 03:17

@ Freddie555

It's very interesting...

hello everybody

JUST ONE QUESTION...

WHY WOMEN DON T HAVE MPB LIKE MEN IF THIS IS DUE TO THAT PROTEIN?

sorry for killing your hope WITH THAT BASIC QUESTION BECAUSE DHT CAN EXPLAIN WHT WOMEN DONT HAVE MPB BUT THAT PROTEIN CAN'T

SORRY FOR MY ENGLISH FROM FRANCE:-P




needhelp is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Bezzzo

23.03.2012, 03:21

@ Freddie555

It's very interesting...

Funnily enough, this topic came up in the news on the radio this morning on my way to work. With the announcer stating that scientists had found the cause but a yet to work out how to block the receptors or implement a way to lower these PgD2levels.

One this that kind of worries me though, from wiki " The concentration of PGD2 in asthma-patients is 10 times higher than in control patients ", not every Asthma patient is going bald. ( I actually used to get asthma pretty bad though..lol)

In the text provided in this thread, by memory they only stated the balding area had 3 times the normal level of PgD2. Who knows.....




Bezzzo is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
cal

23.03.2012, 04:01

@ Bezzzo

It's very interesting...

Looking at the big picture for a moment -

Any thoughts about whether this holds the possibility of restoring long-lost hair? Or are we looking at mainly a loss prevention method?

Or do we not know enough to guess either way?




cal is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Bezzzo

23.03.2012, 04:25

@ cal

It's very interesting...

» Looking at the big picture for a moment -
»
» Any thoughts about whether this holds the possibility of restoring
» long-lost hair? Or are we looking at mainly a loss prevention method?
»
» Or do we not know enough to guess either way?

It's meant to hold hope for restoring long lost hair(Any miniaturized follicles, assuming they're still there)and also prevention.

From my understanding, what they're hoping to achieve by blocking the PgD2 receptors is to reverse the miniaturized follicle back into a terminal state, the excessive PgD2 levels thought now to cause hair loss should then have no effect on the hair follicle itself.

But who knows... definitely an interesting one though :)




Bezzzo is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Iron_Man

23.03.2012, 04:25

@ cal

It's very interesting...

» Looking at the big picture for a moment -
»
» Any thoughts about whether this holds the possibility of restoring
» long-lost hair? Or are we looking at mainly ...

Everything we doubtlessly know so far is that Cotsarelis is still looking for research funds.

Secondly, what we also doubtlessly know is that Cotsarelis blocks high PGD2 levels since 2007.
Here is the proof...
http://www.google.com/patents/US20110021599
And here is the result...
[image]




Iron_Man is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
I documented the world’s 1st day-by-day (HST) donor hair regeneration process …


Post reply
GoneWithTheHair

Australia,
23.03.2012, 05:14

@ heiny7

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

I dont know if this means anything but

'Niacin almost doubled plasma PGD2 and 5-HT, but aspirin reduced only PGD2 by 86%. In contrast, luteolin inhibited both plasma PGD2 and 5-HT levels by 100 and 67%, respectively.'

If you google luteolin and pgd2 it apparently strongly inhibits pgd2 in serum so is this worth taking?

Also does this mean taking vitamin b supps with niacin is going to be bad for hair since it doubles pgd2.

Just my own ponderings and not sure what it means.

:-|




GoneWithTheHair is located in AUSTRALIA and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
samt23

23.03.2012, 05:31

@ GoneWithTheHair

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

Let's just rub our head with a bunch of random stuff and see what happens.




samt23 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Bezzzo

23.03.2012, 05:38

@ Iron_Man

It's very interesting...

» » Looking at the big picture for a moment -
» »
» » Any thoughts about whether this holds the possibility of restoring
» » long-lost hair? Or are we looking at mainly ...
»
» Everything we doubtlessly know so far is that Cotsarelis is still looking
» for research funds.
»
» Secondly, what we also doubtlessly know is that Cotsarelis blocks high PGD2
» levels since 2007.
» Here is the proof...
» http://www.google.com/patents/US20110021599
» And here is the result...
» [image]

Interesting find there!

So it's already been on the cards for five years now..

Which can either be a good thing or a bad thing




Bezzzo is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jim73

23.03.2012, 06:36

@ heiny7

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

Well after reading this article for a second time, i am starting to be cautious. It could also be an other attempt to sell un-proven topical cream with nice biology-theory but no FDA results.




jim73 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
Probability of curing hair loss:
1- Aderans (H.M.)
2- Trichoscience (H.M.)
3- Departement of Dermatology at Taiwan Hospital (H.M.)
4- New Improved DHT products (Drug)
5- Follica (G.F.)
6- Histogen (G.F.)


Post reply
georgex6

GREECE ATHENS,
23.03.2012, 07:46

@ jim73

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

this is the patent http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/forum_entry-id-19710.html




georgex6 is located in GREECE ATHENS and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
hairman2

23.03.2012, 09:38

@ jim73

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» Well after reading this article for a second time, i am starting to be
» cautious. It could also be an other attempt to sell un-proven topical cream
» with nice biology-theory but no FDA results.

I'm generally a bit cautious. This "breakthrough" might just well lead to nothing at all.




hairman2 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

23.03.2012, 10:23

@ Van Halen

It's very interesting...

» What can we do as a community to get more answers on this product? From
» what I read they already know it works, they have the investors, now what ?
»
» Anyway Hairsite can dig up some info? You know I own a website with around
» 20 000 members.
» What's the time table on this product. this summer or 5 yrs? Don't
» understand seems like most of the stuff already passed FDa
»
» anyways

Doesn't it seem like all we need to do is wait for the oral version of the drug to come to market and then cococt a topical version of it on our own. The oral version of the drug should come to market within a 1 - 2 years. It's already in phase 2/3.




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

23.03.2012, 10:27

@ samt23

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» Let's just rub our head with a bunch of random stuff and see what happens.


And you complain about my posts. What a laugh!

I think you're a troll.

Everything you post is useless pathetic sh!t.




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

23.03.2012, 10:29

@ hairman2

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» » Well after reading this article for a second time, i am starting to be
» » cautious. It could also be an other attempt to sell un-proven topical
» cream
» » with nice biology-theory but no FDA results.
»
» I'm generally a bit cautious. This "breakthrough" might just well lead to
» nothing at all.


Yea, but it's still worth contemplating and possibly trying to turn the oral pills into a topical when the pills come to market.




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
ccmethinning

23.03.2012, 11:18

@ GoneWithTheHair

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» I dont know if this means anything but
»
» 'Niacin almost doubled plasma PGD2 and 5-HT, but aspirin reduced only PGD2
» by 86%. In contrast, luteolin inhibited both plasma PGD2 and 5-HT levels by
» 100 and 67%, respectively.'
»

» If you google luteolin and pgd2 it apparently strongly inhibits pgd2 in
» serum so is this worth taking?
»
» Also does this mean taking vitamin b supps with niacin is going to be bad
» for hair since it doubles pgd2.
»
» Just my own ponderings and not sure what it means.
»
» :-|

It might just be a coincidence, but last year I took 500mg Niacin as a GH booster 5 days a week for about 6 months. In that time period, I went from a NW1 to a NW2 (I'm 20yo, was 19 when taking Niacin). Since I have stopped taking Niacin, I feel like my rate of loss has decreased. I am predisposed to MPB from my dad's side (he was NW6 at 28) but safe from my mom's side. This theory might definitely be legit, I can't say for sure, but Niacin may have caused or accelerated my hair loss.




ccmethinning is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
georgex6

GREECE ATHENS,
23.03.2012, 14:13

@ ccmethinning

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

is that true?

Someone on another forum posted this about this new research,

Quote:
There are two types of PGD2 receptors, DP1 and DP2 (DP2 is also known as 'GPR44' and 'CRTH2'). Laropiprant (Merck's drug) selectively blocks the PD1 receptor - Cotsarelis showed that the PD2 receptor (and not PD1) is involved in hair growth downregulation. BTW, niacin produces flushing via the PD1 receptor - the PD2 receptor is not involved in the flushing at all.


and then this

Quote:
Setipiprant by Actelion blocks the right PGD2 receptor implicated in MPB (PD2). Right now, setipiprant is in phase 2/3 testing.

http://www.hairlosstalk.com/interact/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=72328




georgex6 is located in GREECE ATHENS and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Dogstar

23.03.2012, 17:14

@ georgex6

Scientist Discover Protein Responsible for MPB - Huge News

» is that true?
»
» Someone on another forum posted this about this new research,
»
» Quote:
» There are two types of PGD2 receptors, DP1 and DP2 (DP2 is also known as
» 'GPR44' and 'CRTH2'). Laropiprant (Merck's drug) selectively blocks the PD1
» receptor - Cotsarelis showed that the PD2 receptor (and not PD1) is
» involved in hair growth downregulation. BTW, niacin produces flushing via
» the PD1 receptor - the PD2 receptor is not involved in the flushing at
» all.
»
»
» and then this
»
» Quote:
» Setipiprant by Actelion blocks the right PGD2 receptor implicated in MPB
» (PD2). Right now, setipiprant is in phase 2/3 testing.
»
» http://www.hairlosstalk.com/interact/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=72328

That was posted by TAGOHL further up the page, someone has quoted him on another forum.




Dogstar is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Dogstar

23.03.2012, 17:29

@ cal

It's very interesting...

» Looking at the big picture for a moment -
»
» Any thoughts about whether this holds the possibility of restoring
» long-lost hair? Or are we looking at mainly a loss prevention method?
»
» Or do we not know enough to guess either way?

In this article about the findings Cotsarelis is quoted as saying

It's also not known whether a treatment that inhibits PGD2 could restore hair to skin that's already bald, Cotsarelis says, but he hopes that it might. In 2011, he and his team showed that hair-follicle stem cells are still intact in balding skin, but that their proliferation is inhibited5. If PGD2 is the inhibitor, then blocking it may allow stem cells to proliferate and give rise to new follicles. “Whether the follicle will be as big as before, it's hard to know,” he says.

http://www.nature.com/news/clues-to-the-cause-of-male-pattern-baldness-1.10277




Dogstar is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

23.03.2012, 17:30

@ needhelp

It's very interesting...

» hello everybody
»
» JUST ONE QUESTION...
»
» WHY WOMEN DON T HAVE MPB LIKE MEN IF THIS IS DUE TO THAT PROTEIN?
»
» sorry for killing your hope WITH THAT BASIC QUESTION BECAUSE DHT CAN
» EXPLAIN WHT WOMEN DONT HAVE MPB BUT THAT PROTEIN CAN'T
»
» SORRY FOR MY ENGLISH FROM FRANCE:-P


women do have androgenetic alopecia. there are 20 million women in america dealing with androgenetic alopecia. that is a lot of women.




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

23.03.2012, 17:39

@ Dogstar

It's very interesting...

» » Looking at the big picture for a moment -
» »
» » Any thoughts about whether this holds the possibility of restoring
» » long-lost hair? Or are we looking at mainly a loss prevention method?
» »
» » Or do we not know enough to guess either way?
»
» In this article about the findings Cotsarelis is quoted as saying
»
» It's also not known whether a treatment that inhibits PGD2
» could restore hair to skin that's already bald, Cotsarelis says, but he
» hopes that it might. In 2011, he and his team showed that hair-follicle
» stem cells are still intact in balding skin, but that their proliferation
» is inhibited5. If PGD2 is the inhibitor, then blocking it may allow stem
» cells to proliferate and give rise to new follicles. “Whether the follicle
» will be as big as before, it's hard to know,” he says.
»
» http://www.nature.com/news/clues-to-the-cause-of-male-pattern-baldness-1.10277


well, of course as soon as the oral pill form of this stuff comes to market in a year or two we should make a topical version and try it.




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Hanibal

23.03.2012, 17:44

@ TAGOHL

It's very interesting...

So, what do we have in this story?
We know Merc’s laropiprant is targeting PGD1 protein receptors. So, it’s not what we want, unless you have flushing problem.
Actelion’s setipiprant indeed is targeting PGD2 protein receptor CRTH2 (http://www1.actelion.com/en/scientists/development-pipeline/phase-2/setipiprant.page).
But can someone confirm that CRTH2 is the same GPR44 receptor?
If that is true, soon we going to be able to buy this setipiprant from Switzerland, use it as tablets or crush it and make it as topical, and prove or dishonour Cotsarelis.




Hanibal is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
goata007

23.03.2012, 17:45

@ cal

It's very interesting...

» Looking at the big picture for a moment -
»
» Any thoughts about whether this holds the possibility of restoring
» long-lost hair? Or are we looking at mainly a loss prevention method?
»
» Or do we not know enough to guess either way?

Theoretically, if you remove the inhibitor - the follicles should return to their normal state i.e. producing terminal hair. So, the study does imply that it will give us our hair back.




goata007 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
"If we knew what it was that we were doing, it wouldn't be called research, would it?" - Albert Einstein


Post reply
Hanibal

23.03.2012, 17:47

@ TAGOHL

It's very interesting...

So, what do we have in this story?
We know Merc’s laropiprant is targeting PGD1 protein receptors. So, it’s not what we want, unless you have flushing problem.
Actelion’s setipiprant indeed is targeting PGD2 protein receptor CRTH2 (http://www1.actelion.com/en/scientists/development-pipeline/phase-2/setipiprant.page).
But can someone confirm that CRTH2 is the same GPR44 receptor?
If that is true, soon we going to be able to buy this setipiprant from Switzerland, use it as tablets or crush it and make it as topical, and prove or dishonour Cotsarelis.




Hanibal is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Iron_Man

23.03.2012, 18:08

@ goata007

It's very interesting...

» So, the study does imply
» that it will give us our hair back.

Of course - that's one intention of Cots study.

On the other hand, it's not so bad at least to imply this,
because this holds p....'s somewhat back from doing suicide or so.
[image]




Iron_Man is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
I documented the world’s 1st day-by-day (HST) donor hair regeneration process …


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