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benji

13.01.2008, 07:15
 

Read the entire Follica Patent (Costarialis) here: (Hair Multiplication & Stem Cells Treatment)

http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/wo.jsp?wo=2006105109&IA=WO2006105109&DISPLAY=DESC


That should be the wounding patent.........................with the example section about halfway down describing some of their experiments with mice and immuno-deficient mice with human skin grafted onto them, etc.




benji is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
TAGOHL

13.01.2008, 07:40

@ benji

Read the entire Follica Patent (Costarialis) here:

Thanks. I will dissect it tomorrow. At a quick glance, it looks like they use EGF inhibitors to promote hair follicle formation after wounding. There are various EGF antagonists already on the market for the treatment of certain cancers. This raises the possibility of a do-it-yourself treatment, although I don't know how much these drugs cost, their availability, or whether they would make suitable topicals.




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Post reply
benji

13.01.2008, 07:56

@ benji

Minox actually used in Example 14 of patent

EXAMPLE 16

ENHANCEMENT OF EDIHN BY ADMINISTRATION OF MINOXIDIL

[000235] To determine the effect of minoxidil on EDIHN, recombinant FGF is administered 11 days after incisional wounding, as decribed in Example 11. Minoxidil administration enhances HF formation, showing that new HF can be generated by (a) disrupting the epidermis; and (b) administering a minoxidil



I got a kick out of that




Hair REMOVALin the patent also:

EXAMPLE 17

REMOVAL OF HF BY ABRASION AND ADMINISTRATION OF EGF

[000236] Hair-bearing regions of the epidermis of mice is abraded, as decribed in Example 1, then administering recombinant EGF, as described in Example 1. This method prevents hair re-growth in the abraded areas, showing that hair can be removed by (a) disrupting the epidermal layer; and (b) administering EGF, a nucleotide encoding EGF, or a factor that increases signaling by EGF.
I honestly think complete and utter hair removal in any area might be a mistake, as the areas of the skin that dont have hair probably wont have sebaceous glands, and thus might age terribly. Ive noticed over the years that some women who pluck their moustaches end up having very aged skin with vertical wrinkles over their mouths



THE HUMAN SKIN EXAMPLE, and "the money shot" for me personally

EXAMPLE 7

EDIHN-INDUCES NEW HAIR FOLLICLES IN HUMAN SKIN

MATERIALS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS

Grafting

[000210] Discarded human, adult scalp from the preauricular area obtained from plastic surgery was grafted onto immunodeficient (scid) mice. The graft was bandaged and allowed to heal, then was used in the wound healing study 3 months after grafting.

RESULTS

[000211 ] To determine whether human skin responded to EDIHN as did mouse skin, human skin was grafted onto SCID (immuno-deficient) mice and subjected to depilation by plucking and wound induction three days later. Seven days following wound induction, formation of new HF was observed in the human skin (Figure 2 IA; arrows indicate new HF) by hematoxylin and eosin staining of paraffin embedded tissue sections.

[000212] In additional experiments, adult human skin was grafted onto mice., abraded, and examined at 7 days post-abrasion. New HF were generated in the human skkx, which mimicked normal hair follicle formation during fetal development, as evidenced by staining for SlOO A6 or S100A4 (Figure 21B).

P-7628-PC

[000213] The results of this Example show that EDIHN can be used to generate hair growth inhuman skin as for mouse skin.




Thats the part I get excited about. Human hair on human skin. That is when I really got excited (and still am) about Intercytex, when they grew human hair on the mousebacks






By the way..................not that anyone seems interested, but I found a patent for the reduction of sebum with cedarwood oil in a Johnson and Johnson study. If the cedarwood oil worked by anti-androgenic means, it very well might be an effect topical anti-androgen that could be had very cheaply. I posted the patent at hairlosstbalk, but nobody seemed to care. Cedarwood oil was one of the four essential oils used in the scottish alopecia areata study published in THE ARCHIVES OF DERMATOLOGY that resulted in this astonishing regrowth photo:
http://archderm.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/134/11/1349/FIGDST8013F5?ck=nck




benji is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
cal

13.01.2008, 11:46

@ benji

Minox actually used in Example 14 of patent

Do we have any indication about the strength of the results on this yet? Density, for example?

I'm thinking in regards to areas of hair that are MPB-thinned but still there.

It seems like any type of dermabrasion that knocks the skin far enough back to restart the follicle-forming process is also going to have demolished any existing follicles in the process. So I would be concerned about whether this WNT/wounding process can really guarantee a net-gain on hair in areas that are thinning. Not much point in wiping out an existing 50 hairs/cm2 just to try to regrow 25.

We know that they can increase hair shaft thickness by dumping more WNT onto them after the 9-day period, but that doesn't say anything about the basic density that they're sprouting yet. And wouldn't doing multiple rounds of this abrasion/regrowing process just kill the previous new results on that spot each time?




cal is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
ESP

E-mail

13.01.2008, 18:15

@ benji

Minox actually used in Example 14 of patent

Benji,

Thanks for helping make the board worth reading over the past 10 days. Seems like we've been stuck in the doldrums for months.


» I honestly think complete and utter hair removal in any area
» might be a mistake, as the areas of the skin that dont have hair probably
» wont have sebaceous glands, and thus might age terribly. Ive noticed over
» the years that some women who pluck their moustaches end up having very
» aged skin with vertical wrinkles over their mouths

I've noticed this as well, but always attributed it to the aging effect of puckering one's lips (as when smoking). But I agree with you that the sebum issue deserves considerable attention--it was brought up before when we were discussing Aderans photos showing a completely new hair (including sebacious gland) being created.

My concern is that, as a lot of men age and become more bald, their scalps appear to become more oily, either because their sebacious output increases, or because they have less hair to absorb their usual sebum output (or both). With this in mind, wouldn't it be better to completely remove the hair follicle (including the sebacious gland) before implementing Follica's procedure? Otherwise, we'd have new sebacious glands in addition to old ones, which would result in a really greasy looking head of hair by lunch time every day. (Assuming a usual, "wake up, shower and wash your hair routine" before heading to work everyday). How important is it for sebacious glands to remain active after baldness sets in anyway? Is there any scientific evidence that it helps preserve the youthfulness of skin?



»
» By the way..................not that anyone seems interested, but I found
» a patent for the reduction of sebum with cedarwood oil in a Johnson and
» Johnson study. If the cedarwood oil worked by anti-androgenic means, it
» very well might be an effect topical anti-androgen that could be had very
» cheaply. I posted the patent at hairlosstbalk, but nobody seemed to care.
» Cedarwood oil was one of the four essential oils used in the scottish
» alopecia areata study published in THE ARCHIVES OF DERMATOLOGY that
» resulted in this astonishing regrowth photo:
» http://archderm.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/134/11/1349/FIGDST8013F5?ck=nck

I'm definitely interested--Thanks!!




ESP is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
-ESP


Post reply
benji

14.01.2008, 01:35

@ ESP

Minox actually used in Example 14 of patent

ESP wrote:

"..........................wouldn't it be better to completely
» remove the hair follicle (including the sebacious gland) before
» implementing Follica's procedure? Otherwise, we'd have new sebacious
» glands in addition to old ones, which would result in a really greasy
» looking head of hair by lunch time every day.Ive thought about this myself. The sebaceous glands men had are still there. A topical anti-androgen should reduce sebum output of them, but its certainly a concern. Assuming they could "kill" the the miniaturuzed hairs and the glands actually died with them, I suppose they could go about it in that way, but it does seem rather unlikely doesn't it? Ive wondered about this myself...........




» Is there any scientific evidence that it helps preserve
» the youthfulness of skin? Sebum seems to be photoprotective, and Klingman thought it was an evolutionary holdover that used to help waterproof us. But the thing is is that women only have a child's amount of sebum compared to a man, so I always had trouble with the waterproofing conclusion. It IS supposed to be photoprotective, and the excessive collagen deposition in baldness (shiny scalp), is also photoprotective, but both could be coincidental. Ive seen some gleaming bald heads in my time. I work with a man whose bald head shines and reflects light so well, you could damn near comb your own hair in your reflection off his dome. He is about thirty-five.




benji is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
benji

14.01.2008, 01:49

@ benji

One more sebaceous observation for ESP

you know when you think about it...................ICXs procedure that makes hair follicles would also make new sebaceous glands for the truly de noveau hairs and not rejuvinated ones. You'd probably get some of both with that method also, because the hairs they made had sebaceous glands also..........


I suppose that is something men will have do deal with to some extent irregardless of which method gets to market first


Im just glad there is another possiblility out there for us. With two prospective ways to "get back" lost hair, the math is looking good for those of us who have lost some hair that can't be regrown (like my temples).




benji is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
TAGOHL

14.01.2008, 02:00

@ TAGOHL

LOL

» I don't know how much these drugs cost

Ok, one EGF receptor inhibitor mentioned in the patent (gefitinib) costs over $2K for 30 tablets. I guess this would be a hurdle for those of us who want to try an exmperiment on our own.




TAGOHL is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
benji

14.01.2008, 02:06

@ TAGOHL

LOL

» » I don't know how much these drugs cost
»
» Ok, one EGF receptor inhibitor mentioned in the patent (gefitinib) costs
» over $2K for 30 tablets. I guess this would be a hurdle for those of us
» who want to try an exmperiment on our own.



Pow..............that hurts. Thats got to be about the priciest drug Ive ever seen.




benji is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
goata007

14.01.2008, 02:21

@ benji

One more sebaceous observation for ESP

» you know when you think about it...................ICXs procedure that
» makes hair follicles would also make new sebaceous glands for the truly de
» noveau hairs and not rejuvinated ones. You'd probably get some of both with
» that method also, because the hairs they made had sebaceous glands
» also..........

Intercytex's website says that they are working on both neogenesis & rejuvenation. It also mentions that they prefer rejuvenation because in that case they don't have to worry about direction issues and such. I personally prefer rejuvenation too. Even if it doesn't work for everyone, there wouldn't be any downside to giving it a try a few times.




goata007 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
"If we knew what it was that we were doing, it wouldn't be called research, would it?" - Albert Einstein


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