Hair Loss Forum - PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER) - hair loss baldness treatment

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Boyinhtown

Houston, TX,
23.03.2012, 15:19
 

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER) - hair loss baldness treatment (Hair Multiplication & Stem Cells Treatment)

http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php

Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)

We already have the cures available.
Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find any online.

Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.

For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment topical obtained from any store.

Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it also helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male pattern baldness the shape)

Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular CALCIUM

That is what me and many others have been saying , that calcification leads to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.

Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2 receptor antagonist.

So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products that actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2 has been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.




Boyinhtown is located in HOUSTON, TX and he is available to meet: YES
email hairsite@aol.com to arrange a meeting.


Post reply
kalevra

23.03.2012, 17:03

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
»
» Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
»

Hirai(2002)
Cutting edge: agonist effect of indomethacin on a prostaglandin D2 receptor, CRTH2. J Immunol 168:981–985.




kalevra is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
TaKeeLa

23.03.2012, 17:14

@ kalevra

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

These aren't the same receptors? You are saying DP2 and CRTH2 not PGD2??




TaKeeLa is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
TaKeeLa

23.03.2012, 17:14

@ TaKeeLa

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» These aren't the same receptors? You are saying DP2 and CRTH2 not PGD2??

I think this is what you are looking for....

Setipiprant by Actelion blocks the right PGD2 receptor implicated in MPB (PD2). Right now, setipiprant is in phase 2/3 testing.




TaKeeLa is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
kalevra

23.03.2012, 17:22

@ TaKeeLa

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » These aren't the same receptors? You are saying DP2 and CRTH2 not PGD2??
»
» I think this is what you are looking for....
»
» Setipiprant by Actelion blocks the right PGD2 receptor implicated in MPB
» (PD2). Right now, setipiprant is in phase 2/3 testing.

CRTH2 (or GPR44) Antagonists:

Indole-3-acetic acids
Ramatroban and analogues
4-aminotetrahydroquinoline derivatives K117 and K604


Garza and coauthors identified the receptor GPR44 to be responsible for mediating the negative effects of PGD2.




kalevra is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
kalevra

23.03.2012, 17:35

@ TaKeeLa

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» These aren't the same receptors? You are saying DP2 and CRTH2 not PGD2??

Prostaglandin D2 (or PGD2) binds to the receptor PTGDR (as well as CRTH2 or GPR44)




kalevra is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

23.03.2012, 18:23

@ TaKeeLa

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » These aren't the same receptors? You are saying DP2 and CRTH2 not PGD2??
»
» I think this is what you are looking for....
»
» Setipiprant by Actelion blocks the right PGD2 receptor implicated in MPB
» (PD2). Right now, setipiprant is in phase 2/3 testing.

So setipiprant is almost done with studies and will be available soon. Then we can turn the pills into a topical and see what happens. Is that correct?




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
bugler

23.03.2012, 19:50
(edited by bugler, 23.03.2012, 20:08)

@ jarjarbinx

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

Sounds too easy and too good to be true.

Anyway read the side-effects before taking anything.
Most medicines are poissons.




bugler is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
Who did 911: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YC8j-uvZUI0


Post reply
GoneWithTheHair

Australia,
24.03.2012, 02:19

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

Im kind of clueless about all this but after googling im tending to think avoiding niacin might be advisable. I actually took a b vitamin supp with niacin for quite a while which gave me the 'flush' and at the time i was experiencing shedding. Theres no proof this caused it as i was taking other things but when im reading how niacin increases pgd2 in skin i think id rather be safe than sorry.

I also have read how aspirin, and the antioxident quercetin (available in supplement) can reduce pgd2 in skin. and also EPA in fish oil reduces prostaglandins including pgd2.

While im not expecting major results i think it might be worth throwing these into my diet and avoiding niacin.

Just my uneducated ramblings.




GoneWithTheHair is located in AUSTRALIA and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
cal

24.03.2012, 03:16

@ GoneWithTheHair

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

I have yet to find anything that is good for health but also hurts hair in any significant way.

Niacin is very good for the body and the cardiovascular system in particular.




cal is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
GoneWithTheHair

Australia,
24.03.2012, 03:52

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

so do people think its worth taking this Indomethacin or not? its a non steroid anti-inflamm for athritis. Its fairly cheap off that site. Or is this just wishful thinking.




GoneWithTheHair is located in AUSTRALIA and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
BRIANBOY12

24.03.2012, 06:52

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
»
» Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
»
» We already have the cures available.
» Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find any
» online.
»
» Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.
»
» For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
» of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment topical
» obtained from any store.
»
» Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it also
» helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male pattern
» baldness the shape)
»
» Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular CALCIUM
»
» That is what me and many others have been saying , that calcification leads
» to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.
»
» Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2
» receptor antagonist.
»
» So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products that
» actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2 has
» been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why
» Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.


Isn't indomethacin an agonist for the receptor crth2? Doesn't that mean it triggers a reaction when bound to the crth2 receptor, as opposed blocking / inhibiting a reaction. An antagonist would be an inhibitor / blocker. (J Immunol. 2002 Feb 1;168(3):981-5.
Cutting edge: agonistic effect of indomethacin on a prostaglandin D2 receptor, CRTH2.)




BRIANBOY12 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Bezzzo

26.03.2012, 10:54

@ BRIANBOY12

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

I'll tell you what though, the asprin thing has got me a little curios, about a month ago i developed a really bad tooth ache which lasted a couple days where i took a sh*t load of Ibuprofen for the pain and didn't think anything of it.

A week or two later i noticed my vellus hair was unusually thicker, kind of like when you take Minoxodil for the first time for a week or so and you see a difference in the vellus hair thickness and length. I started to think what could have caused it,, blah blah blah.. and only just made the connection after reading all this stuff in this and other posts.

Now I'm not saying 100% this was caused by taking Ibuprofen, who knows it's possible it just looked thicker than it actually was, but I'm not on any hair treatment at all, not even minox anymore(Don't ask, lol). So if it was actually thicker vellus hair odds are it's plausible it could be because of taking Ibuprofen, BUT NOT FACT!.


Here's some details on Wiki about Ibuprofen.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibuprofen

" Ibuprofen (INN) (play /ˈaɪbjuːproʊfɛn/ or /aɪbjuːˈproʊfən/ EYE-bew-PROH-fən; from the nomenclature iso-butyl-propanoic-phenolic acid) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for relief of symptoms of arthritis, fever,[1] as an analgesic (pain reliever), especially where there is an inflammatory component, and dysmenorrhea. "

" Ibuprofen is used primarily for fever, pain, dysmenorrhea and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.[8] It is also used for pericarditis and patent ductus arteriosus.[8] "

" Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen work by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX), which converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 (PGH2). PGH2, in turn, is converted by other enzymes to several other prostaglandins (which are mediators of pain, inflammation, and fever) and to thromboxane A2 (which stimulates platelet aggregation, leading to the formation of blood clots).

Like aspirin, indomethacin, and all other NSAIDs,[citation needed] ibuprofen is considered a nonselective COX inhibitor; that is, it inhibits two isoforms of cyclooxygenase, COX-1 and COX-2. The analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory activity of NSAIDs appears to be achieved mainly through inhibition of COX-2, whereas inhibition of COX-1 would be responsible for unwanted effects on platelet aggregation and the gastrointestinal tract.[32] However, the role of the individual COX isoforms in the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and gastric damage effects of NSAIDs is uncertain and different compounds cause different degrees of analgesia and gastric damage.[33]

In order to achieve the beneficial effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDS without gastrointestinal ulceration and bleeding, selective COX-2 inhibitors were developed to inhibit the COX-2 isoform without inhibition of COX-1.[34] "


Anyway, some food for thought :)

IN NO WAY SHAPE OR FORM AM I SUGGESTING ANYONE SHOULD START TAKING IBUPROFEN AS A POSSIBLE HAIRLOSS TREATMENT, NOR DO I PLAN ON USING IBUPROFEN MYSELF FOR ANYTHING OTHER THAN ITS RECOMMENDED USE. SERIOUSLY GUYS!




Bezzzo is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
moawk

Germany,
26.03.2012, 11:31

@ Bezzzo

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» I'll tell you what though, the asprin thing has got me a little curios,
» about a month ago i developed a really bad tooth ache which lasted a couple
» days where i took a sh*t load of Ibuprofen for the pain and didn't think
» anything of it.
»
» A week or two later i noticed my vellus hair was unusually thicker, kind of
» like when you take Minoxodil for the first time for a week or so and you
» see a difference in the vellus hair thickness and length. I started to
» think what could have caused it,, blah blah blah.. and only just made the
» connection after reading all this stuff in this and other posts.
»
» Now I'm not saying 100% this was caused by taking Ibuprofen, who knows it's
» possible it just looked thicker than it actually was, but I'm not on any
» hair treatment at all, not even minox anymore(Don't ask, lol). So if it was
» actually thicker vellus hair odds are it's plausible it could be because of
» taking Ibuprofen, BUT NOT FACT!.
»
»
» Here's some details on Wiki about Ibuprofen.
» http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibuprofen
»
» " Ibuprofen (INN) (play /ˈaɪbjuːproʊfɛn/ or
» /aɪbjuːˈproʊfən/ EYE-bew-PROH-fən; from the
» nomenclature iso-butyl-propanoic-phenolic acid) is a nonsteroidal
» anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for relief of symptoms of arthritis,
» fever,[1] as an analgesic (pain reliever), especially where there is an
» inflammatory component, and dysmenorrhea. "
»
» " Ibuprofen is used primarily for fever, pain, dysmenorrhea and
» inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.[8] It is also used for
» pericarditis and patent ductus arteriosus.[8] "
»
» " Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen work by inhibiting
» the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX), which converts arachidonic acid to
» prostaglandin H2 (PGH2). PGH2, in turn, is converted by other enzymes to
» several other prostaglandins (which are mediators of pain, inflammation,
» and fever) and to thromboxane A2 (which stimulates platelet aggregation,
» leading to the formation of blood clots).
»
» Like aspirin, indomethacin, and all other NSAIDs,[citation needed]
» ibuprofen is considered a nonselective COX inhibitor; that is, it inhibits
» two isoforms of cyclooxygenase, COX-1 and COX-2. The analgesic,
» antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory activity of NSAIDs appears to be
» achieved mainly through inhibition of COX-2, whereas inhibition of COX-1
» would be responsible for unwanted effects on platelet aggregation and the
» gastrointestinal tract.[32] However, the role of the individual COX
» isoforms in the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and gastric damage effects of
» NSAIDs is uncertain and different compounds cause different degrees of
» analgesia and gastric damage.[33]
»
» In order to achieve the beneficial effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDS
» without gastrointestinal ulceration and bleeding, selective COX-2
» inhibitors were developed to inhibit the COX-2 isoform without inhibition
» of COX-1.[34] "
»
»
» Anyway, some food for thought :)
»


my follicles are dying...ans suffering from the DHT :(. Maybe Ibuprofen can ease the pain :(, I can hear the screaming as they jump out of my already bald scalp.
» IN NO WAY SHAPE OR FORM AM I SUGGESTING ANYONE SHOULD START TAKING
» IBUPROFEN AS A POSSIBLE HAIRLOSS TREATMENT, NOR DO I PLAN ON USING
» IBUPROFEN MYSELF FOR ANYTHING OTHER THAN ITS RECOMMENDED USE. SERIOUSLY
» GUYS!




moawk is located in GERMANY and he is available to meet: NO

---
1. Predicted the failure of replicel, months in advance.
2. Predicted how their stock would rise/drop even with exact numbers.
3. Predicted the wild claims and crazyness that gc83uk's donor regeneration will cause among the HT industry during this summer. Including rassman's opinion, Dr. Woods special patients and Pro hair clinic photos.
4. Predicted Gho will open up a clinic in asia.
5. No prediction on Histogen. Looks promising if they didn't fake results.
6. Predicted the only viable HM technique other than Gho would surface when hairs are: "generated through the appropriate cell populations" -Team Tokyo 2012


[image]
- Moawk

Advice for patients: If you are considering a hair transplant, only consider Gho's HST and nothing else. First HT treatment in the world that offers: zero scarring, small downtime and donor regrowth.
http://www.hasci.com

Advice for Investors in HM: Invest in Team Tokyo.
http://www.tsuji-lab.com/en/research/organ/hair.html
Ditch replicel, aderans. They are done for and have no future.


Post reply
Bezzzo

26.03.2012, 11:43

@ moawk

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

»
» my follicles are dying...ans suffering from the DHT :(. Maybe Ibuprofen can
» ease the pain :(, I can hear the screaming as they jump out of my already
» bald scalp.
» » IN NO WAY SHAPE OR FORM AM I SUGGESTING ANYONE SHOULD START TAKING
» » IBUPROFEN AS A POSSIBLE HAIRLOSS TREATMENT, NOR DO I PLAN ON USING
» » IBUPROFEN MYSELF FOR ANYTHING OTHER THAN ITS RECOMMENDED USE. SERIOUSLY
» » GUYS!


Lol!




Bezzzo is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
hairman2

26.03.2012, 15:43

@ Bezzzo

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

I REALLY doubt that aspirin has a significant effect on hairloss. Millions of people take aspirin each day. I think that if there was a significant correlation, it would not have gone unnoticed.

» I'll tell you what though, the asprin thing has got me a little curios,
» about a month ago i developed a really bad tooth ache which lasted a couple
» days where i took a sh*t load of Ibuprofen for the pain and didn't think
» anything of it.
»
» A week or two later i noticed my vellus hair was unusually thicker, kind of
» like when you take Minoxodil for the first time for a week or so and you
» see a difference in the vellus hair thickness and length. I started to
» think what could have caused it,, blah blah blah.. and only just made the
» connection after reading all this stuff in this and other posts.
»
» Now I'm not saying 100% this was caused by taking Ibuprofen, who knows it's
» possible it just looked thicker than it actually was, but I'm not on any
» hair treatment at all, not even minox anymore(Don't ask, lol). So if it was
» actually thicker vellus hair odds are it's plausible it could be because of
» taking Ibuprofen, BUT NOT FACT!.
»
»
» Here's some details on Wiki about Ibuprofen.
» http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibuprofen
»
» " Ibuprofen (INN) (play /ˈaɪbjuːproʊfɛn/ or
» /aɪbjuːˈproʊfən/ EYE-bew-PROH-fən; from the
» nomenclature iso-butyl-propanoic-phenolic acid) is a nonsteroidal
» anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for relief of symptoms of arthritis,
» fever,[1] as an analgesic (pain reliever), especially where there is an
» inflammatory component, and dysmenorrhea. "
»
» " Ibuprofen is used primarily for fever, pain, dysmenorrhea and
» inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.[8] It is also used for
» pericarditis and patent ductus arteriosus.[8] "
»
» " Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen work by inhibiting
» the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX), which converts arachidonic acid to
» prostaglandin H2 (PGH2). PGH2, in turn, is converted by other enzymes to
» several other prostaglandins (which are mediators of pain, inflammation,
» and fever) and to thromboxane A2 (which stimulates platelet aggregation,
» leading to the formation of blood clots).
»
» Like aspirin, indomethacin, and all other NSAIDs,[citation needed]
» ibuprofen is considered a nonselective COX inhibitor; that is, it inhibits
» two isoforms of cyclooxygenase, COX-1 and COX-2. The analgesic,
» antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory activity of NSAIDs appears to be
» achieved mainly through inhibition of COX-2, whereas inhibition of COX-1
» would be responsible for unwanted effects on platelet aggregation and the
» gastrointestinal tract.[32] However, the role of the individual COX
» isoforms in the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and gastric damage effects of
» NSAIDs is uncertain and different compounds cause different degrees of
» analgesia and gastric damage.[33]
»
» In order to achieve the beneficial effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDS
» without gastrointestinal ulceration and bleeding, selective COX-2
» inhibitors were developed to inhibit the COX-2 isoform without inhibition
» of COX-1.[34] "
»
»
» Anyway, some food for thought :)
»
» IN NO WAY SHAPE OR FORM AM I SUGGESTING ANYONE SHOULD START TAKING
» IBUPROFEN AS A POSSIBLE HAIRLOSS TREATMENT, NOR DO I PLAN ON USING
» IBUPROFEN MYSELF FOR ANYTHING OTHER THAN ITS RECOMMENDED USE. SERIOUSLY
» GUYS!




hairman2 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Sutekh

27.03.2012, 00:32

@ kalevra

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » These aren't the same receptors? You are saying DP2 and CRTH2 not
» PGD2??
» »
» » I think this is what you are looking for....
» »
» » Setipiprant by Actelion blocks the right PGD2 receptor implicated in MPB
» » (PD2). Right now, setipiprant is in phase 2/3 testing.
»
» CRTH2 (or GPR44) Antagonists:
»
» Indole-3-acetic acids
» Ramatroban and analogues
» 4-aminotetrahydroquinoline derivatives K117 and K604
»
»
» Garza and coauthors identified the receptor GPR44 to be responsible for
» mediating the negative effects of PGD2.

Ramatroban is available at : http://www.ebiochem.com/product/ramatroban-18446 in quantities of grams. Baynas (Japanese Ramatroban) is dosed at 150mg day.

Wondering if this is worth taking orally to see any effect ?




Sutekh is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Ahab

27.03.2012, 01:08

@ hairman2

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» I REALLY doubt that aspirin has a significant effect on hairloss. Millions
» of people take aspirin each day. I think that if there was a significant
» correlation, it would not have gone unnoticed.


But they don't take it every day for months on end.




Ahab is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
balki

27.03.2012, 01:14

@ Ahab

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » I REALLY doubt that aspirin has a significant effect on hairloss.
» Millions
» » of people take aspirin each day. I think that if there was a significant
» » correlation, it would not have gone unnoticed.
»
»
» But they don't take it every day for months on end.

In fact, they do. Lots of people take a daily dose of aspirin for heart-related issues, and it's even been recommended to stave off cancer.

My question is simply, could the fact that it's topical vs. a pill matter? People who take it orally for extended periods take a small, small dosage because large dosage of aspirin can cause stomach problems.




balki is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

27.03.2012, 02:40

@ Ahab

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » I REALLY doubt that aspirin has a significant effect on hairloss.
» Millions
» » of people take aspirin each day. I think that if there was a significant
» » correlation, it would not have gone unnoticed.
»
»
» But they don't take it every day for months on end.


I've been taking asprin every day for years and I continue losing hair.




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
jarjarbinx

27.03.2012, 02:42

@ balki

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » I REALLY doubt that aspirin has a significant effect on hairloss.
» » Millions
» » » of people take aspirin each day. I think that if there was a
» significant
» » » correlation, it would not have gone unnoticed.
» »
» »
» » But they don't take it every day for months on end.
»
» In fact, they do. Lots of people take a daily dose of aspirin for
» heart-related issues, and it's even been recommended to stave off cancer.
»
» My question is simply, could the fact that it's topical vs. a pill matter?
» People who take it orally for extended periods take a small, small dosage
» because large dosage of aspirin can cause stomach problems.


I've been taking 325 mgs per day for years as part of my anti-cancer regimen and I continue losing hair. Asprin is NOT a cure for hair loss. If asprin grew hair I would tell you guys and then be gone forevermore. Asprin does not grow hair.




jarjarbinx is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
hairman2

27.03.2012, 08:27

@ Ahab

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » I REALLY doubt that aspirin has a significant effect on hairloss.
» Millions
» » of people take aspirin each day. I think that if there was a significant
» » correlation, it would not have gone unnoticed.
»
»
» But they don't take it every day for months on end.

in fact millions of people do.




hairman2 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
gutted2

27.03.2012, 15:08

@ hairman2

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1510057/

Caffeine increased the outputs of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from the guinea-pig uterus on days 7 and 15 of the oestrous cycle.




gutted2 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
balki

27.03.2012, 15:47

@ gutted2

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1510057/
»
» Caffeine increased the outputs of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), PGE2
» and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from the guinea-pig uterus on days 7 and 15 of the
» oestrous cycle.

Probably a dumb question, but humor me... if this were true...

...does this mean we should or should not be ingesting caffeine? In other words, according to this new research, do we want to inhibit PGF2 alpha?




balki is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
gutted2

27.03.2012, 17:39

@ balki

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1510057/
» »
» » Caffeine increased the outputs of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha),
» PGE2
» » and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from the guinea-pig uterus on days 7 and 15 of the
» » oestrous cycle.
»
» Probably a dumb question, but humor me... if this were true...
»
» ...does this mean we should or should not be ingesting caffeine? In other
» words, according to this new research, do we want to inhibit PGF2 alpha?


alpecin seem to think caffiens is good for hair.

the cots study stated certain prostglandins were good for hair, im sure i read f2alpha was one of them.




gutted2 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
balki

27.03.2012, 18:27

@ gutted2

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1510057/
» » »
» » » Caffeine increased the outputs of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha),
» » PGE2
» » » and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from the guinea-pig uterus on days 7 and 15 of
» the
» » » oestrous cycle.
» »
» » Probably a dumb question, but humor me... if this were true...
» »
» » ...does this mean we should or should not be ingesting caffeine? In
» other
» » words, according to this new research, do we want to inhibit PGF2 alpha?
»
»
» alpecin seem to think caffiens is good for hair.
»
» the cots study stated certain prostglandins were good for hair, im sure i
» read f2alpha was one of them.

Thank you.

Baldness seems to be more and more related in one way or another to inflammation.




balki is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
gutted2

27.03.2012, 19:01

@ balki

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » » http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1510057/
» » » »
» » » » Caffeine increased the outputs of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2
» alpha),
» » » PGE2
» » » » and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from the guinea-pig uterus on days 7 and 15 of

»
» Thank you.
»
» Baldness seems to be more and more related in one way or another to
» inflammation.

yes, figuring out what causes this inflammation is key.

you will find pgd2 elevated in all parts of the body, where inflamtion is present, not just in the scalp.

personally i think if you can figure what the cause of this inflamtion is, you can prevent someone from going bald.




gutted2 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Ahab

27.03.2012, 19:23

@ balki

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » I REALLY doubt that aspirin has a significant effect on hairloss.
» » Millions
» » » of people take aspirin each day. I think that if there was a
» significant
» » » correlation, it would not have gone unnoticed.
» »
» »
» » But they don't take it every day for months on end.
»
» In fact, they do. Lots of people take a daily dose of aspirin for
» heart-related issues, and it's even been recommended to stave off cancer.
»
» My question is simply, could the fact that it's topical vs. a pill matter?
» People who take it orally for extended periods take a small, small dosage
» because large dosage of aspirin can cause stomach problems.

I anticipated that someone would bring up those people who take aspirin regularly for reasons of heart health.

But a few things about that:

First as you mentioned, the daily dose is tiny; maybe a larger dose is needed to stimulate hair growth.

Next, most people taking aspirin for heart health are likely very old, and not paying attention to what's left of their hair. They also may not have the best memories for remembering what their hair looked like six months earlier compared to today.

Both of the above in concert--a possibly too tiny a dose to have a dramatic affect on hairloss coupled with indifference to small signs of hair regrowth--would explain why those people taking tiny doses of aspirin for long periods do not notice any regrowth.




Ahab is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Ahab

27.03.2012, 19:24

@ jarjarbinx

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » I REALLY doubt that aspirin has a significant effect on hairloss.
» » Millions
» » » of people take aspirin each day. I think that if there was a
» significant
» » » correlation, it would not have gone unnoticed.
» »
» »
» » But they don't take it every day for months on end.
»
»
» I've been taking asprin every day for years and I continue losing hair.

Maybe you'd have lost more without the aspirin.

Maybe you'd have lost less taking even more aspirin.




Ahab is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
balki

27.03.2012, 19:32

@ gutted2

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » » » http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1510057/
» » » » »
» » » » » Caffeine increased the outputs of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2
» » alpha),
» » » » PGE2
» » » » » and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from the guinea-pig uterus on days 7 and 15
» of
»
» »
» » Thank you.
» »
» » Baldness seems to be more and more related in one way or another to
» » inflammation.
»
» yes, figuring out what causes this inflammation is key.
»
» you will find pgd2 elevated in all parts of the body, where inflamtion is
» present, not just in the scalp.
»
» personally i think if you can figure what the cause of this inflamtion is,
» you can prevent someone from going bald.

Would you agree that this is kinda how minoxidil works? Treating the inflammation? I suppose this really brings us to thinking in those terms. What treats inflammation of the skin. I keep seeing interesting connections here.

1) A number of anti-inflammatories seem to help a bit with baldness.
2) On the other end, I thought it was interesting to learn long term usage of Asprin is associated with sexual dysfunction. This gets me questioning why that would be the case. Obviously, this parallels with Finasteride.
3) If Asprin really is causing sexual dysfunction (which is very debatable), is this because the pgd2 ties in with DHT? How exactly?
4) Due to the forementioned, it seems to me that the long term answer here will have to be topical, or we could run into the same issues as finasteride.
5) I'm curious of the number of folks who are balding and whether they have other issues related to inflammation. I have allergies, for example.




balki is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
gutted2

27.03.2012, 20:28

@ balki

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » » » » http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1510057/
» » » » » »
» » » » » » Caffeine increased the outputs of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2
» » » alpha),
» » » » » PGE2
» » » » » » and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from the guinea-pig uterus on days 7 and
» 15
» » of
» »
» » »
» » » Thank you.
» » »
» » » Baldness seems to be more and more related in one way or another to
» » » inflammation.
» »
» » yes, figuring out what causes this inflammation is key.
» »
» » you will find pgd2 elevated in all parts of the body, where inflamtion
» is
» » present, not just in the scalp.
» »
» » personally i think if you can figure what the cause of this inflamtion
» is,
» » you can prevent someone from going bald.
»
» Would you agree that this is kinda how minoxidil works? Treating the
» inflammation? I suppose this really brings us to thinking in those terms.
» What treats inflammation of the skin. I keep seeing interesting connections
» here.
»
» 1) A number of anti-inflammatories seem to help a bit with baldness.
» 2) On the other end, I thought it was interesting to learn long term usage
» of Asprin is associated with sexual dysfunction. This gets me questioning
» why that would be the case. Obviously, this parallels with Finasteride.
» 3) If Asprin really is causing sexual dysfunction (which is very
» debatable), is this because the pgd2 ties in with DHT? How exactly?
» 4) Due to the forementioned, it seems to me that the long term answer here
» will have to be topical, or we could run into the same issues as
» finasteride.
» 5) I'm curious of the number of folks who are balding and whether they have
» other issues related to inflammation. I have allergies, for example.

no i wouldnt say minox works by treating the inflamation.
Minox (also mentioned in one of the recent pgd2 articles) is thought to increase a certain enzyme which is used to synthesize some beneficial prostglandins.

you are right, there are intresting connections, there is a complex ,knock on effect of pathways involved in baldness.
Finding the right point in the pathway to modulate is ideal, to limit side effects.

but in my opinion dr, cots should have put more research into identifying the trigger.

I dont believe genetics is totally to blame. There could be an elemnt but there are enviromental factors which aggrevate it.




gutted2 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
shivers20

27.03.2012, 23:32

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
»
» Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
»
» We already have the cures available.
» Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find any
» online.
»
» Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.
»
» For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
» of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment topical
» obtained from any store.
»
» Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it also
» helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male pattern
» baldness the shape)
»
» Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular CALCIUM
»
» That is what me and many others have been saying , that calcification leads
» to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.
»
» Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2
» receptor antagonist.
»
» So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products that
» actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2 has
» been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why
» Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.


Indomethacin is a cox-1 and cox-2 inhibitor, its already available as topical, no need to mix. A few studies shows that it reduces
intraocular pressure which is similar to what bimatoprost does.




shivers20 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
shivers20

28.03.2012, 00:01

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

According to the Cost study, PGD2-treated hair was significantly shortened, while PGD2's derivative, 15-dPGJ2, completely inhibited hair growth. What are some ways we can reduce 15-dPGJ2? In one study on mice (nothing to do with hairloss)showed that PGH2 is first converted to PGD2 by lipocalin-type PGD2 synthase (L-PGDS) or hematopoietic (H)-PGDS, which then undergoes sequential non-enzymatic dehydration reactions to form 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2). The results showed that toxicity of 15d-PGJ2 to mOP cells is related to intracellular GSH levels. An increase in glutathione reduced the effect of 15d-PGJ2 in MOP cells.

http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/4/1/18




shivers20 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
shivers20

28.03.2012, 05:02

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

New study came out today showing that thyme improves acne. Luteolin is found in thyme in great amounts. Luteolin plays a role in cox-2.




shivers20 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
elvispresley

28.03.2012, 05:20

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
»
» Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
»
» We already have the cures available.
» Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find any
» online.
»
» Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.
»
» For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
» of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment topical
» obtained from any store.
»
» Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it also
» helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male pattern
» baldness the shape)
»
» Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular CALCIUM
»
» That is what me and many others have been saying , that calcification leads
» to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.
»
» Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2
» receptor antagonist.
»
» So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products that
» actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2 has
» been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why
» Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.



guys can we create a liste of substances that go against the receptor?


this is a question for the expert off course because i have no idea of waht are the substance:

so I/WE can start to try this substance, specially TOPICALLY , for example vinegar on the bald spot...


thx a lot




elvispresley is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Sutekh

28.03.2012, 05:52

@ elvispresley

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
» »
» » Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
» »
» » We already have the cures available.
» » Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find any
» » online.
» »
» » Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.
» »
» » For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
» » of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment
» topical
» » obtained from any store.
» »
» » Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it also
» » helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male pattern
» » baldness the shape)
» »
» » Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular
» CALCIUM
» »
» » That is what me and many others have been saying , that calcification
» leads
» » to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.
» »
» » Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2
» » receptor antagonist.
» »
» » So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products that
» » actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2 has
» » been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why
» » Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.
»
»
»
» guys can we create a liste of substances that go against the receptor?
»
»
» this is a question for the expert off course because i have no idea of waht
» are the substance:
»
» so I/WE can start to try this substance, specially TOPICALLY , for example
» vinegar on the bald spot...
»
»
» thx a lot

According to Pettipher and Hansel "Antagonists of the Prostaglandin D2 Receptor CRTH2" Drug News and Perspectives Vol 21 July/August 2008, the synthetic antagonists of the CRTH2/GPR44 receptor are :

Ramatroban and analogues
4-Aminotetrahydroquinoline derivatives K-117 and K-604
Indole acetic acids

Have also read that Quercetin reduces PGD2 release.




Sutekh is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
elvispresley

28.03.2012, 07:47

@ Sutekh

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
» » »
» » » Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
» » »
» » » We already have the cures available.
» » » Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find any
» » » online.
» » »
» » » Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.
» » »
» » » For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
» » » of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment
» » topical
» » » obtained from any store.
» » »
» » » Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it
» also
» » » helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male pattern
» » » baldness the shape)
» » »
» » » Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular
» » CALCIUM
» » »
» » » That is what me and many others have been saying , that calcification
» » leads
» » » to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.
» » »
» » » Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2
» » » receptor antagonist.
» » »
» » » So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products that
» » » actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2
» has
» » » been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why
» » » Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.
» »
» »
» »
» » guys can we create a liste of substances that go against the receptor?
» »
» »
» » this is a question for the expert off course because i have no idea of
» waht
» » are the substance:
» »
» » so I/WE can start to try this substance, specially TOPICALLY , for
» example
» » vinegar on the bald spot...
» »
» »
» » thx a lot
»
» According to Pettipher and Hansel "Antagonists of the Prostaglandin D2
» Receptor CRTH2" Drug News and Perspectives Vol 21 July/August 2008, the
» synthetic antagonists of the CRTH2/GPR44 receptor are :
»
» Ramatroban and analogues
» 4-Aminotetrahydroquinoline derivatives K-117 and K-604
» Indole acetic acids
»
» Have also read that Quercetin reduces PGD2 release.


thx a lot another 2 things:

1)u wrote some name of substances , but where i can find them in nature? just to put them on the bald spot and observe the reactions of the body?

2) what do u guys think about this : http://www.agenericdrugs.com/?s=Reusin%20Topico

do u think is working against the correct receptor of PGD2?

thx a lot




elvispresley is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Rob35

28.03.2012, 09:47

@ elvispresley

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » » http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
» » » »
» » » » Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
» » » »
» » » » We already have the cures available.
» » » » Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find
» any
» » » » online.
» » » »
» » » » Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.
» » » »
» » » » For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
» » » » of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment
» » » topical
» » » » obtained from any store.
» » » »
» » » » Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it
» » also
» » » » helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male
» pattern
» » » » baldness the shape)
» » » »
» » » » Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular
» » » CALCIUM
» » » »
» » » » That is what me and many others have been saying , that
» calcification
» » » leads
» » » » to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.
» » » »
» » » » Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2
» » » » receptor antagonist.
» » » »
» » » » So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products
» that
» » » » actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2
» » has
» » » » been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why
» » » » Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.
» » »
» » »
» » »
» » » guys can we create a liste of substances that go against the receptor?
»
» » »
» » »
» » » this is a question for the expert off course because i have no idea of
» » waht
» » » are the substance:
» » »
» » » so I/WE can start to try this substance, specially TOPICALLY , for
» » example
» » » vinegar on the bald spot...
» » »
» » »
» » » thx a lot
» »
» » According to Pettipher and Hansel "Antagonists of the Prostaglandin D2
» » Receptor CRTH2" Drug News and Perspectives Vol 21 July/August 2008, the
» » synthetic antagonists of the CRTH2/GPR44 receptor are :
» »
» » Ramatroban and analogues
» » 4-Aminotetrahydroquinoline derivatives K-117 and K-604
» » Indole acetic acids
» »
» » Have also read that Quercetin reduces PGD2 release.
»
»
» thx a lot another 2 things:
»
» 1)u wrote some name of substances , but where i can find them in nature?
» just to put them on the bald spot and observe the reactions of the body?
»
» 2) what do u guys think about this :
» http://www.agenericdrugs.com/?s=Reusin%20Topico
»
» do u think is working against the correct receptor of PGD2?
»
» thx a lot



Sodium Cromoglicate blocks pgd2 . Sold under the name Galpharm Eye drops.




Rob35 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
georgex6

GREECE ATHENS,
28.03.2012, 10:53

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
»
» Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
»
» We already have the cures available.
» Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find any
» online.
»
» Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.
»
» For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
» of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment topical
» obtained from any store.
»
» Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it also
» helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male pattern
» baldness the shape)
»
» Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular CALCIUM
»
» That is what me and many others have been saying , that calcification leads
» to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.
»
» Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2
» receptor antagonist.
»
» So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products that
» actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2 has
» been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why
» Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.
From a quick search that i've done it is very cheap and i can find in any pharmacy without prescription indometacin pills-gel or spray
so do you think its worth a try? what about side effects on long term IM WORRIED ABOUT THIS :-(




georgex6 is located in GREECE ATHENS and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
georgex6

GREECE ATHENS,
28.03.2012, 10:56

@ georgex6

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
» »
» » Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
» »
» » We already have the cures available.
» » Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find any
» » online.
» »
» » Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.
» »
» » For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
» » of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment
» topical
» » obtained from any store.
» »
» » Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it also
» » helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male pattern
» » baldness the shape)
» »
» » Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular
» CALCIUM
» »
» » That is what me and many others have been saying , that calcification
» leads
» » to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.
» »
» » Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2
» » receptor antagonist.
» »
» » So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products that
» » actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2 has
» » been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why
» » Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.
» From a quick study that i've done it is very cheap and i can find in any
» pharmacy without prescription indometacin pills-gel or spray
» so do you think its worth a try? what about side effects on long term IM
» WORRIED ABOUT THIS :-(
I also saw that indometacin reduces (PGs), 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha, PGE2 and PGD2, is this a problem??? http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2595317




georgex6 is located in GREECE ATHENS and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
elvispresley

28.03.2012, 11:26

@ georgex6

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » http://http://www.valuepharmaceuticals.com/Indocin.php
» »
» » Indometacin - Shown to block dp2 (crth2 receptor)
» »
» » We already have the cures available.
» » Get the powder form and make your own topical since I didn't find any
» » online.
» »
» » Or use a compounding pharmacy overseas perhaps.
» »
» » For DP1 receptor blockade aspirin works great. The topical form
» » of aspirin is salicylic acid which is a common acne/skin treatment
» topical
» » obtained from any store.
» »
» » Bengay also contains a very similar ingredient as to aspirin and it also
» » helps relax muscles ( the galea and other areas that give male pattern
» » baldness the shape)
» »
» » Also, DP2 when it is increased, get this: increases intracellular
» CALCIUM
» »
» » That is what me and many others have been saying , that calcification
» leads
» » to hair follicle death. Well now we know that happens due to DP2.
» »
» » Vinegar I think is another item (acetic acid) that i think is a dp2
» » receptor antagonist.
» »
» » So instead of waiting for some company to make pills and products that
» » actually already exist and by the way turns out this research on dp2 has
» » been released partially already for many years... so I dont' see why
» » Costralies or whatever his name is taking all the credit.
» From a quick search that i've done it is very cheap and i can find in any
» pharmacy without prescription indometacin pills-gel or spray
» so do you think its worth a try? what about side effects on long term IM
» WORRIED ABOUT THIS :-(

hi george can u post some links of the indometacin GEL and SPRAY , i want to try also.

another thing on the CROMOGLICATE sodium i copypasty from wikipedia , i wuold like to know which form is the most cheap because i want to try also to put on the bald spot : this is wikiquote: let me know guys!! thx

Cromoglicic acid is available in multiple forms:
as a nasal spray (Rynacrom(UK), Nasalcrom, Prevalin (Netherlands)) to treat allergic rhinitis.
in a nebulizer solution for aerosol administration to treat asthma.
as an inhaler (Intal) for preventive management of asthma.[2] The maker of Intal, King Pharmaceuticals, has discontinued manufacturing the inhaled form, cromolyn sodium inhalation aerosol, due to issues involving CFC-free propellant. As stocks are depleted, this inhaler preparation will no longer be available to patients.[3] In the EU it is manufactured without CFCs by Sanofi-Aventis, although it must be imported from Canada for USA residents.
as eye drops (Opticrom and Optrex Allergy (UK), Crolom) for allergic conjunctivitis
in an oral form (Gastrocrom) to treat mastocytosis,[4] dermatographic urticaria and ulcerative colitis. Another oral product, Intercron (sodium cromoglicate in distilled water, from Zambon France), is used for food allergies.




elvispresley is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
georgex6

GREECE ATHENS,
28.03.2012, 11:38

@ elvispresley

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » From a quick search that i've done it is very cheap and i can find in
» any
» » pharmacy without prescription indometacin pills-gel or spray
» » so do you think its worth a try? what about side effects on long term IM
» » WORRIED ABOUT THIS :-(
»
» hi george can u post some links of the indometacin GEL and SPRAY , i want
» to try also.
»
» another thing on the CROMOGLICATE sodium i copypasty from wikipedia , i
» wuold like to know which form is the most cheap because i want to try also
» to put on the bald spot : this is wikiquote: let me know guys!! thx
»
» Cromoglicic acid is available in multiple forms:
» as a nasal spray (Rynacrom(UK), Nasalcrom, Prevalin (Netherlands)) to treat
» allergic rhinitis.
» in a nebulizer solution for aerosol administration to treat asthma.
» as an inhaler (Intal) for preventive management of asthma.[2] The maker of
» Intal, King Pharmaceuticals, has discontinued manufacturing the inhaled
» form, cromolyn sodium inhalation aerosol, due to issues involving CFC-free
» propellant. As stocks are depleted, this inhaler preparation will no longer
» be available to patients.[3] In the EU it is manufactured without CFCs by
» Sanofi-Aventis, although it must be imported from Canada for USA
» residents.
» as eye drops (Opticrom and Optrex Allergy (UK), Crolom) for allergic
» conjunctivitis
» in an oral form (Gastrocrom) to treat mastocytosis,[4] dermatographic
» urticaria and ulcerative colitis. Another oral product, Intercron (sodium
» cromoglicate in distilled water, from Zambon France), is used for food
» allergies.
SORRY but is from greek pharmacy http://www.galinos.gr/web/drugs/main/substances/indometacin




georgex6 is located in GREECE ATHENS and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
elvispresley

28.03.2012, 11:58
(edited by elvispresley, 28.03.2012, 12:28)

@ georgex6

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » » From a quick search that i've done it is very cheap and i can find in
» » any
» » » pharmacy without prescription indometacin pills-gel or spray
» » » so do you think its worth a try? what about side effects on long term
» IM
» » » WORRIED ABOUT THIS :-(
» »
» » hi george can u post some links of the indometacin GEL and SPRAY , i
» want
» » to try also.
» »
» » another thing on the CROMOGLICATE sodium i copypasty from wikipedia , i
» » wuold like to know which form is the most cheap because i want to try
» also
» » to put on the bald spot : this is wikiquote: let me know guys!! thx
» »
» » Cromoglicic acid is available in multiple forms:
» » as a nasal spray (Rynacrom(UK), Nasalcrom, Prevalin (Netherlands)) to
» treat
» » allergic rhinitis.
» » in a nebulizer solution for aerosol administration to treat asthma.
» » as an inhaler (Intal) for preventive management of asthma.[2] The maker
» of
» » Intal, King Pharmaceuticals, has discontinued manufacturing the inhaled
» » form, cromolyn sodium inhalation aerosol, due to issues involving
» CFC-free
» » propellant. As stocks are depleted, this inhaler preparation will no
» longer
» » be available to patients.[3] In the EU it is manufactured without CFCs
» by
» » Sanofi-Aventis, although it must be imported from Canada for USA
» » residents.
» » as eye drops (Opticrom and Optrex Allergy (UK), Crolom) for allergic
» » conjunctivitis
» » in an oral form (Gastrocrom) to treat mastocytosis,[4] dermatographic
» » urticaria and ulcerative colitis. Another oral product, Intercron
» (sodium
» » cromoglicate in distilled water, from Zambon France), is used for food
» » allergies.
» SORRY but is from greek pharmacy
» http://www.galinos.gr/web/drugs/main/substances/indometacin

so at the moment what can be usefull is :

1)http://www.agenericdrugs.com/?s=Indometacin%20Gel%20/%20Oint
2)http://cincottachemist.com.au/product/126551-buy-rynacrom-nasal-spray-26ml-online


i think the price/quuantity of the eye drops is not good they are too expensive so i think that 2 are the solutions to try.


the first is the INDOMETACIN GEL (very cheap)
the second is the spray with CROMOGLYCATE.

if someone know other products specially topical and cheap write here , yeah!

also this is interesting for the prices
http://www.pbs.gov.au/medicine/item/1127H-2878L-4468E-5529B-8334P-8767K




elvispresley is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
hairman2

28.03.2012, 17:23

@ Ahab

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» Both of the above in concert--a possibly too tiny a dose to have a dramatic
» affect on hairloss coupled with indifference to small signs of hair
» regrowth--would explain why those people taking tiny doses of aspirin for
» long periods do not notice any regrowth.

look there are people that get terrible headaches (migraines etc). My friends supervisor used to take 7 aspirins a day against her migraines, and i'm sure she was not even the most extreme case. I'm certain that there are a ton of bald man out there who take a sh*t ton of aspirin each day. If aspirin regrew hair, I think we would know about it.




hairman2 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
haroldo

29.03.2012, 15:47

@ Rob35

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» Sodium Cromoglicate blocks pgd2 . Sold under the name Galpharm Eye drops.

Seems to work by blocking PGD2 release from mast cells however whereas the elevated PGD2 in balding scalp comes from the type of PGD synthase most often found in the brain - PTGDS, and not from mast cell degranulation.




haroldo is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Boyinhtown

Houston, TX,
31.03.2012, 11:06

@ elvispresley

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

I want to correct my self and agree with some of the posters that
Indomethicin is actually a AGONIST, not an ANTAGONIST... meaning it encourages receptors to bind........not stop binding..

My fault......




Boyinhtown is located in HOUSTON, TX and he is available to meet: YES
email hairsite@aol.com to arrange a meeting.


Post reply
Kaganh

21.08.2012, 21:18

@ hairman2

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

I realize I'm a few months late here, but wanted to share a thought. Aspirin's effect on hairloss would not be noticed easily because of the way it is typically used. It has a limited effect on long term PGD2 reduction as it circulates in the bloodstream. A slight reduction in PGD2 would alleviate some local pain, but not make a major difference for buildup in scalp tissue. On the other hand Tromalite Salicylate nas been shown in tests to remain in specific tissue for up to 12-24 hours and significantly limit the buildup of PGD2s in that tissue. Salicylate is the active ingredient in aspirin, and Tromalite Salicylate is applied topically to treat arthritis, shingles pain, and as a pre-workout to limit soreness. Aspercreme is the most readily available OTC product containing it. Independent studies have confirmed it's ability to delay and limit PGD2 production around muscles and tissue to which it is applied directly. You can imagine why trials concerning its use as an AA remedy would NOT be conducted. There is no profit in finding a new use for an existing drug as simple as aspirin. This is why all testing and research is aimed at targeting the reaction further upstream. Identifying and retarding a process necessary, but upstream from the actual development of PGD2 would be a new development, and worthy of a patent. I'm not saying topical salicylates will or will not work. Just that there is NO interest at all in finding out. Salicylates are naturally produced by many plant life as a natural defense against disease. It's been around forever, and any negative side effects are minimal and/or only realized at extremely high doses.

I recently added aspercreme to my regimen. I apply to one half of my scalp 2-3 times daily. Like aspirin, it is completely safe up to 6 doses per day. I am only using it on one side in order to determine if there is any impact different from everything else I'm doing.

Additionally, and this may be complete coincidence, but I started taking 500McG of biotin and 720 mg of fish oil, as well as a Tbs of flax oil once a day in an effort to increase my omega-3 intake. The first thing to grab my attention was a remarkable increase in my eyelash length and thickness. My wife commented on it, and the only thing I could tie its development to was the nutrients I had started about 2 weeks prior. Within the next few days, I also noticed a significant thickening of hair in my thinning areas. No new hairs, but what was there was much thicker, darker, and healthier looking.

Further research confirmed that omega 6 and omega 3 imbalances can contribute to prostaglandin production. Apparently, having a higher omega 3 intake in relation to omega 6 helps the body producte more PGE2, which in itself works counter to PGD2.

I'm certainly not a scientist, and this is obviously only the tip of the iceberg, as I'm sure there's a great deal more to it. However, the worst case scenario for upping my omega 3 is a healthier body all-around, so I'll stick to it whether its helping with hair loss or not. And, I wouldn't be at all surprised if hair loss was somehow tied to poor diet, or a genetic susceptibility to the effects of a poor diet which results in hair loss.

Any true remedy for AA would require a great deal of money in research and development. That investment would only be made if the goal is patent worthy, and as such, any positive effects of simple solutions would not just be ignored, but outright oppressed by those making the investments.

If I'm going to be a guinea pig, I'll stick to things like increasing omega 3 intake and applying aspirin to my scalp rather than taking drugs that may ultimately turn me into a woman (Finasteride).



» I REALLY doubt that aspirin has a significant effect on hairloss. Millions
» of people take aspirin each day. I think that if there was a significant
» correlation, it would not have gone unnoticed.
»
» » I'll tell you what though, the asprin thing has got me a little curios,
» » about a month ago i developed a really bad tooth ache which lasted a
» couple
» » days where i took a sh*t load of Ibuprofen for the pain and didn't think
» » anything of it.
» »
» » A week or two later i noticed my vellus hair was unusually thicker, kind
» of
» » like when you take Minoxodil for the first time for a week or so and you
» » see a difference in the vellus hair thickness and length. I started to
» » think what could have caused it,, blah blah blah.. and only just made
» the
» » connection after reading all this stuff in this and other posts.
» »
» » Now I'm not saying 100% this was caused by taking Ibuprofen, who knows
» it's
» » possible it just looked thicker than it actually was, but I'm not on any
» » hair treatment at all, not even minox anymore(Don't ask, lol). So if it
» was
» » actually thicker vellus hair odds are it's plausible it could be because
» of
» » taking Ibuprofen, BUT NOT FACT!.
» »
» »
» » Here's some details on Wiki about Ibuprofen.
» » http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibuprofen
» »
» » " Ibuprofen (INN) (play /ˈaɪbjuːproʊfɛn/ or
» » /aɪbjuːˈproʊfən/ EYE-bew-PROH-fən; from
» the
» » nomenclature iso-butyl-propanoic-phenolic acid) is a nonsteroidal
» » anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for relief of symptoms of arthritis,
» » fever,[1] as an analgesic (pain reliever), especially where there is an
» » inflammatory component, and dysmenorrhea. "
» »
» » " Ibuprofen is used primarily for fever, pain, dysmenorrhea and
» » inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.[8] It is also used
» for
» » pericarditis and patent ductus arteriosus.[8] "
» »
» » " Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen work by
» inhibiting
» » the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX), which converts arachidonic acid to
» » prostaglandin H2 (PGH2). PGH2, in turn, is converted by other enzymes to
» » several other prostaglandins (which are mediators of pain, inflammation,
» » and fever) and to thromboxane A2 (which stimulates platelet aggregation,
» » leading to the formation of blood clots).
» »
» » Like aspirin, indomethacin, and all other NSAIDs,[citation needed]
» » ibuprofen is considered a nonselective COX inhibitor; that is, it
» inhibits
» » two isoforms of cyclooxygenase, COX-1 and COX-2. The analgesic,
» » antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory activity of NSAIDs appears to be
» » achieved mainly through inhibition of COX-2, whereas inhibition of COX-1
» » would be responsible for unwanted effects on platelet aggregation and
» the
» » gastrointestinal tract.[32] However, the role of the individual COX
» » isoforms in the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and gastric damage effects
» of
» » NSAIDs is uncertain and different compounds cause different degrees of
» » analgesia and gastric damage.[33]
» »
» » In order to achieve the beneficial effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDS
» » without gastrointestinal ulceration and bleeding, selective COX-2
» » inhibitors were developed to inhibit the COX-2 isoform without
» inhibition
» » of COX-1.[34] "
» »
» »
» » Anyway, some food for thought :)
» »
» » IN NO WAY SHAPE OR FORM AM I SUGGESTING ANYONE SHOULD START TAKING
» » IBUPROFEN AS A POSSIBLE HAIRLOSS TREATMENT, NOR DO I PLAN ON USING
» » IBUPROFEN MYSELF FOR ANYTHING OTHER THAN ITS RECOMMENDED USE. SERIOUSLY
» » GUYS!




Kaganh is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
waxtorex

11.09.2012, 15:49

@ Kaganh

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

Hey Kaganh,

I was just wondering if you have any updates on the progress of your hair growth. Aside from the vitamins, and the Aspercreme, is there anything else in your regimen that may be helping?

Thanks




waxtorex is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO


Post reply
Freddie555

11.09.2012, 22:26

@ waxtorex

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

Just an anecdotal observation over the years.. But of the before and after pictures I've seen of people who grew cosmetically significant amounts of hair, one thing that I often find in their regimen is fish oil.

Of course they take a bunch of other nick knacks but I always notice fish oil among one of the many things they take.




Freddie555 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
"When true Hair Multiplication comes, it will arise out of the East." - John The Revelator, Feb. 18, 2001


Post reply
Boyinhtown

Houston, TX,
12.09.2012, 08:09

@ Freddie555

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» Just an anecdotal observation over the years.. But of the before and after
» pictures I've seen of people who grew cosmetically significant amounts of
» hair, one thing that I often find in their regimen is fish oil.
»
» Of course they take a bunch of other nick knacks but I always notice fish
» oil among one of the many things they take.


Good observation Freddie!




Boyinhtown is located in HOUSTON, TX and he is available to meet: YES
email hairsite@aol.com to arrange a meeting.


Post reply
jim73

12.09.2012, 14:21

@ Boyinhtown

PGD2 RECEPTOR 2 ANTAGONIST (BLOCKER)

» » Just an anecdotal observation over the years.. But of the before and
» after
» » pictures I've seen of people who grew cosmetically significant amounts
» of
» » hair, one thing that I often find in their regimen is fish oil.
» »
» » Of course they take a bunch of other nick knacks but I always notice
» fish
» » oil among one of the many things they take.
»
»
» Good observation Freddie!

Yeah Very Good Observation.. And we all know that all fish have hair. :-)




jim73 is located in [NA] and he is available to meet: NO

---
Probability of curing hair loss:
1- Aderans (H.M.)
2- Trichoscience (H.M.)
3- Departement of Dermatology at Taiwan Hospital (H.M.)
4- New Improved DHT products (Drug)
5- Follica (G.F.)
6- Histogen (G.F.)


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